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View Diary: Toxic Texas politics on display in fertilizer plant explosion (126 comments)

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  •  But you're wrong. (1+ / 0-)
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    JerryNA

    This plant hasn't been inspected for 28 years.

    Documents reviewed by The Huffington Post indicate that the last time regulators performed a full safety inspection of the facility was nearly 28 years ago. The entity with primary authority to ensure workplace safety, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, last visited in 1985, according to OSHA records.
    And state regulators did nothing:
    In 2006, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, the primary enforcer of environmental law in the state, noted that two schools were situated within 3,000 feet of the fertilizer plant. But the agency determined that "the impact potential" of an accident on the neighboring community "was low."
    As for Texas, it's home to more dangerous industrial accidents than any other state in the Union:

    Texas -- a state famous for its size and stature -- claims an outsize share of the country's industrial accidents.

    As of May 2012, the state held 1,827 facilities deemed at risk of toxic or flammable chemical accidents, about one-tenth of all those in the nation, according to data from the EPA’s Risk Management Program as tabulated by the Right-to-Know Network, a non-profit government watchdog. Yet the state was responsible for nearly 50 percent of the evacuations and property damage costs caused by accidents at such plants over the previous five years, according to a Huffington Post review of the data.
    So, yeah, you're probably a right wing troll.

    Calling other DKos members "weenies" is a personal insult and therefore against site rules.

    by Bob Johnson on Tue Apr 23, 2013 at 09:07:19 AM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  I'm wrong about what? (0+ / 0-)
      This plant hasn't been inspected for 28 years.
      Documents reviewed by The Huffington Post indicate that the last time regulators performed a full safety inspection of the facility was nearly 28 years ago. The entity with primary authority to ensure workplace safety, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, last visited in 1985, according to OSHA records.
      Um... OSHA?  But I thought this was the Texas GOP's fault... are you a Red State troll?
      And state regulators did nothing:
      In 2006, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, the primary enforcer of environmental law in the state, noted that two schools were situated within 3,000 feet of the fertilizer plant. But the agency determined that "the impact potential" of an accident on the neighboring community "was low."
      That's not workplace safety, which is what I was commenting on.  I said nothing about environmental regulations.
      As of May 2012, the state held 1,827 facilities deemed at risk of toxic or flammable chemical accidents, about one-tenth of all those in the nation, according to data from the EPA’s Risk Management Program as tabulated by the Right-to-Know Network, a non-profit government watchdog. Yet the state was responsible for nearly 50 percent of the evacuations and property damage costs caused by accidents at such plants over the previous five years, according to a Huffington Post review of the data.
      Means nothing without more rigorous analysis of the data.  Texas is a big oil and gas state.  There's a good chance that their facilities are bigger (energy facilities tend to be BIG) and more likely to go "Boom!" than facilities in other states that deal with toxic industrial chemicals.

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