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View Diary: Texas minority neighborhood to bear full brunt of Tar Sands Pipeline (28 comments)

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  •  I wish there were a way to measure consumption (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    marina

    in ways that include toys bought and flights taken and site this type of thing in the neighborhoods of the people who use it. I'd bet the residents of Manchester neighborhood have a pretty small footprint.

    How big is your personal carbon footprint?

    by ban nock on Tue Apr 30, 2013 at 06:28:29 AM PDT

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    •  industry has to go somewhere, (2+ / 0-)
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      Mindful Nature, marina

      and I'd bet that most of the residents of Manchester moved there after the refineries.  If Houston had zoning laws the area would be  classed "industrial" and Manchester would disappear.  It is a "problem" with an obvious solution . . .

      Fake Left, Drive Right . . . not my idea of a Democrat . . .

      by Deward Hastings on Tue Apr 30, 2013 at 06:44:24 AM PDT

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      •  Sanction pollution through zoning? Sounds (2+ / 0-)
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        absdoggy, PDiddie

        like a Koch brothers solution to me.  

        If we really want to straighten out all this crap we really need to think about shit - Holy Shit.

        by John Crapper on Tue Apr 30, 2013 at 06:52:39 AM PDT

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      •  really? and where would the minorities (2+ / 0-)
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        John Crapper, absdoggy

        (who can't afford anyplace else) go?  This is red Texas after all.

        Macca's Meatless Monday

        by VL Baker on Tue Apr 30, 2013 at 06:53:07 AM PDT

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      •  that's one of two solutions (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        marina

        of course the other is that the industry needs also to be regulated so that industrial emissions don't create those hotspots in the first place.  What the hell is going on that they are so leaky?

        So, yes, we can see what causes this problem and we know how to fix a lot of it.

        Touch all that arises with a spirit of compassion

        by Mindful Nature on Tue Apr 30, 2013 at 06:56:56 AM PDT

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        •  I'd bet (0+ / 0-)

          that if you accidentally burn something on the stove you open the windows to "air the house out".  And you bbq outdoors because you don't want the smoke and the smell inside.  Let the neighbors have it.  It's all a matter of scale . . .

          Everybody wants refineries to be "cleaner", and compared to even 50 years ago they are.  But they were originally built "out in the sticks" for a reason . . . and it's usually the case that "town" came to them, not that they moved downtown.

          Fake Left, Drive Right . . . not my idea of a Democrat . . .

          by Deward Hastings on Tue Apr 30, 2013 at 08:13:49 AM PDT

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          •   It's all a matter of scale . . . (0+ / 0-)

            Generally, air regulations exempt all sources under a certain size so that people don't need permits for the BBQ (although where I live wood fires are a pretty big contributor to air pollution, so on bad days they are prohibited.)  

            You are right about the land use history.  Here in California, the Chevron refinery was located far away from the population centers, but the cities grew up around it, so now there are problems. (and that's even with stiff zoning laws).

            But yes, they are much cleaner thanks to us annoying liberal types (like Richard Nixon!)

            Touch all that arises with a spirit of compassion

            by Mindful Nature on Tue Apr 30, 2013 at 08:23:57 AM PDT

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