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View Diary: e-books: who owns my digital library? (184 comments)

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  •  As an author myself, I find it curious that (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Susan from 29, misslegalbeagle, Mikey

    some people are more concerned about the details of ownership when it comes to their book collection (or music library, etc), but can't be bothered to care about the Author's ownership of intellectual property.

    Yeah the big bad Amazons and Barnes & Nobles are protecting their own financials...but also the financials of the Authors from whom they buy content.

    "Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities" Voltaire.

    by JWK on Wed May 08, 2013 at 04:10:56 PM PDT

    •  I don't see it that way (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Susan from 29

      I don't see readers, of all people, being at cross-purposes with writers just because readers want their ebooks to last and be "theirs" in the same way as paper books. Copyright law protects our books from duplication by the same mechanisms whether they're in e or paper format. And I don't see anything about this form of ebook licensing that affects that one way or the other. I'm not sure what financial advantage there is to writers if readers get frustrated or befuddled about our ebooks, or if library budgets get strained by new and different rules applying to them.

      "Sometimes paranoia's just having all the facts." William S. Burroughs

      by scilicet on Wed May 08, 2013 at 04:52:59 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yes, but to lend a book (4+ / 0-)

        you actually have to hand it to someone. And at the end of the lend there is still only one copy of that book in existence. With an ebook, all you have to do is attach it to an email and send it to one or a hundred of your friends, all of whom can easily also then email it to a hundred of their friends and yep, as an e-book author as well, I am suddenly out a lot of money. Which makes it kind of hard to pay the rent, ya know?

        •  I'm sure we agree average reader isn't the problem (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Susan from 29, RiveroftheWest

          and imo if ordinary readers worry their investments can vanish at the click of an ebookstore button, it only depresses ebook sales. Or at least, I personally know several people whose wariness about this, right or wrong, keeps them from buying ebooks. So if we're talking hypothetical loss of sales that pay the rent, this factors in too.

          I guess I just don't see the current limitations on license stopping thievery anyway. Pirates know how to crack text out of protective shells -- in fact, most writers I know had to send out cease & desist notes this week to a web site that was giving away their ebooks without permission. Not to mention the fact that abroad, masses of bound books are digitally scanned and illegally reproduced.

          "Sometimes paranoia's just having all the facts." William S. Burroughs

          by scilicet on Thu May 09, 2013 at 12:50:33 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  And one publisher who has gone DRM free is (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            RiveroftheWest, scilicet

            not seeing an increase in piracy. Of course, TOR is the leader in that field and they admit that their reader base consists of people who could easily defeat any DRM. Still, they have seen no impact on piracy or sales.

            Or at least, I personally know several people whose wariness about this, right or wrong, keeps them from buying ebooks. So if we're talking hypothetical loss of sales that pay the rent, this factors in too.
            My manicurist, OTOH, won't buy ebooks because if there ever is an electromagnetic attack we will all lose our ebooks but she will still have her physical copies. Apparently it didn't occur to her that as I suggested, in the event of an electromagnetic attack, books will be pretty low on anyone's priority list.

            We must not confuse dissent with disloyalty - Edward R. Murrow

            by Susan Grigsby on Thu May 09, 2013 at 12:59:01 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  I think you may have read more into this than (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      RiveroftheWest

      was originally intended.

      No one is disputing the intellectual property or who it belongs to.

      The characters, plot, setting and all of the other elements that make up a story belong strictly to the copyright holder who is generally the author.
      Perhaps I could have made that clearer, but the issue is that  the digital medium changes the way we view ownership of our copy of an author's work. We pay for the digital copy just as we do the physical copy but we don't have anything more than a bunch of zeros and ones to show for it. We can't lend them, bequeath them or even write in their margins. So the ownership experience of an e-book is different.

      This is a new field that I find endlessly fascinating. It creates questions that we really should be asking now, while there are still paper books in stores. As an author, are your rights more fully protected with a physical copy of your work? I don't see how they can be, since it is easier to scan a book to create a digital copy than it is to print an ebook.

      We must not confuse dissent with disloyalty - Edward R. Murrow

      by Susan Grigsby on Wed May 08, 2013 at 05:06:23 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yes, in fact ones rights are more fully (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Susan from 29

        protected with a physical copy over a digital version. The question isn't about printing an ebook. It's the ease with which one can copy the digital version and distribute it to any number of folks electronically.

        I grant you that the experience of owning an ebook is different...just as the distribution of a work is different for the Author. When you say you 'pay for the digital copy just as you pay for the physical copy' you're already going into the bargain with a misconception.  It would be like walking into a car dealership, handing over money to lease the car of your choice, but expecting all the benefits of outright owning the car.

        Personally, I'm a fan of print on demand. Far more environmentally friendly than current print distribution.

        "Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities" Voltaire.

        by JWK on Fri May 10, 2013 at 05:33:52 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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