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View Diary: Why is Corporate America
 fanning the flames of violence in Chicago? (75 comments)

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  •  While I agree with (9+ / 0-)

    much of the sentiments of this post, I think it needs to be made perfectly clear that Chicago is still a good city, not because of Rahm, but in spite of him. It would be a whole lot better if we got a real progressive in his office, but the city is far from the open warfare in the streets cesspool it's being made into by the media, including the blog media, and specifically this post. I walk around in the city all the time, downtown and in many different neighborhoods. I take the CTA--even at night. I am not afraid, and you should not be afraid either. You have to be careful when you make claims that are not true. The worst thing you can do is drive good people off the streets, and out of the city surrendering it to gangs, gun nuts, and police. Then, it will be a self-fulfilling prophesy. Do you remember 1968 when so many homes and businesses were burned out, and the west side was ceded for decades? That helped no progressive causes, and led to no progressive change. It just harmed a lot of people. We cannot let that happen again. I am sort of disappointed in the political groups using hyperbole to make their point (even though the point is valid on many levels) at the expense of the city. Yes, the city has big problems. Yes, the gun violence is way too much. Isn't all gun violence way too much? Yes, the wrong people are in office. Yes, the protests are good and just, and should continue. But ultimately we have to change things through the political process, and scare tactics are IMHO no way to win the elections that need to be won. Look, the NRA folks are marching on DC fully armed. They're the new American Brownshirts, dangerous useful idiots for corporate interests. I hope when the rest of the country sees this, they'll see that things are going too far to the right and it has to be stopped--sort of like the end of the McCarthy era--Americans finally got it when McCarthy went farther than people were willing to accept, and courageous people finally said something. You don't want to give the far-right talking points American can relate to. Ratchet back the rhetoric, and do something we can work with to get the right people in office.

    Using my free speech while I still have it. http://www.ellenofthetenth.blogspot.com/

    by ebgill on Tue May 07, 2013 at 11:48:38 AM PDT

    •  one of the impediments to change in Chicago (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Chi, magnetics

      is that too many people are to invested in their little fiefdoms to join together. Rahm could have been defeated, but all the progressive groups had their own favorite candidates, and none of them would agree on any one candidate who could actually win. They were too interested in jockeying for their own positions.

      Using my free speech while I still have it. http://www.ellenofthetenth.blogspot.com/

      by ebgill on Tue May 07, 2013 at 11:52:47 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Most of the gun violence is confined... (14+ / 0-)

      ...to specific neighborhoods that have been subjected to the kind of racialized poverty that Chicago is famous for. I also walk around the city at all hours and have been riding the CTA for years.

      People in the affected communities often feel their story is not being told except for a few lines buried deep in a newspaper or website when somebody gets shot. There are people in Chicago who have never been to Englewood, Grand Crossing, Humboldt Park, North Lawndale or Austin. They really don't know about what goes on there and the difficulties that people face.

      I try to report what it looks like from their point of view.

      What is not often explained is how most of the Chicago gun violence stems from the class war politics fomented by the wealthy. Racialized poverty is a deliberate policy. Except for a brief period when Harold Washington was mayor (a democratic socialist by the way), racialized poverty has been a bi-partisan policy.

      Finally, elections are only a part of the social change equation. In fact, legislation usually follows social protest and social upheaval. It doesn't lead it.

      "Don't believe everything you think."

      by BobboSphere on Tue May 07, 2013 at 12:25:08 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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