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View Diary: Dog Linguistics, Part 2: Can Dogs Predict Phonemic Splits? (30 comments)

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  •  I seem to recall your alluding (5+ / 0-)

    to a wish that you'd gone into this particular research area (dog linguistics) more formally, and longer ago. Among the many advantages are being not only allowed but required to use terms (and the objects to which they refer), such as toy, ball, and frisbee, in research settings, and to receive besos from subjects without compromising the experiment (or getting involved in an ethics violation investigation). Seriously, though, the research is fascinating and beyond "worthy." Any wonder dogs' (and other animals') have such a profound impact on humans as companions and visitors to senior citizen centers, hospitals/rehab facilities. I believe there are measurable health-related impacts from these interactions. I wonder if this is just the kind of research that has been attacked by conservatives, perhaps funded by NSF Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences, as being wasteful or unworthy of investment. Proof positive that dogs can emerge as more noble quite often than some of our human companions.

    I discover myself on the verge of a usual mistake. ― Walt Whitman, Song of Myself

    by dannyboy1 on Fri May 10, 2013 at 09:58:59 AM PDT

    •  Ha! Good point. :-) (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dannyboy1

      I hadn't thought about the potential problems you point out as inherent in pursuing dog studies as a career. Not sure how I would be able to negotiate the conflicts of interest that would undoubtedly arise, since I certainly would want to be eligible to

      receive besos from subjects without compromising the experiment (or getting involved in an ethics violation investigation).

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