Skip to main content

View Diary: Music Education (54 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  music education is about abstract thought (15+ / 0-)

    math and music are said to fit together, but while I agree that music theory can be like math...i've always felt the main lesson was in abstract thinking and reasoning. and reacting and adjusting.

    if IM on the band stand comping behind a sax player who decides to augment the chord changes in a particular and unusual way, I dont freak out and say "hey...dickhead...that supposed to be a Cminor6 chord!" but instead I adjust to the situation and maybe play the f#minor to B7 that he was trying to imply. not through the mathematical calculations, but through hearing and adjusting in real time. and I know I may have well been speaking Greek in the previous sentences. point being...music teaches you to adjust and go with the flow and not be ridged and plodding and sticking to what is expected

    or another friend of mine had some special ed kids in his band class. when they were finally able to keep steady time on the bass drum they were ecstatic...and the accomplishment went on to feed other advances the kids had.

    plus...popular music has become sonically boring. the democratization of music created through technology has caused significant issues of de-skilling...ie people cant play for shit anymore and they have little tonal imagination...but since they have synths that sound very cool very easily...they THINK they have imagination. Point being....no more public school band means no more oboe or french horn or flute players. no more clarinets. fortunately music like Salsa keeps the trombone alive....but forget about contemporary american popular music...people are clueless as to how to use horns...unless of course its an earth wind and fire sample.

    music is so fundamental to human existence and music education is important just from an appreciation sense. Music is part of the bulk of knowledge of human kind, to not understand a reference to Beethoven or Chopin or Charlie Parker is as deplorable as not getting a reference to Great Expectations or Job.

    personally...i dont care for concert bands (um...that doesnt mean bands like Rush who play in concert) or marching bands. But if i had kids, they would be participating in those things...or Ild be fighting tooth and ail to make sure they had the opportunity...just like I did

    I cant tell if its a West End musical or Marxism in action.

    by Evolution on Thu May 16, 2013 at 10:01:34 AM PDT

    •  One thing I have seen/heard: (6+ / 0-)
      the democratization of music created through technology has caused significant issues of de-skilling
      Has as much to do with the de-emphasis of music in the schools as with technology.

      Kids almost never actually play an instrument themselves any more.  Music is seen as fungible, as everpresent, and as a right.  It's always there, and so not only does it not need to be paid for, but it is not something people create, it is just something like air.  (This is the perception I see more and more).

      When band and chorus and the like were a regular part of school, a larger proportion of people had experience with instruments and with singing, and knew how hard it could be, and what it took to actually get good at it.  Nowadays ... it's not personal.  They have no connection.

      This leads to the kind of awesome rant Harry Connick Jr. just recently did about the ... technicians who compete on "American Idol".

      I am not religious, and did NOT say I enjoyed sects.

      by trumpeter on Thu May 16, 2013 at 10:53:36 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  karaoke killed the band (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        trumpeter, RiveroftheWest

        I've been saying this for two decades now. the advent of karaoke massively devalued the work and effort required to become proficient at any instrument, including voice.
        when the music is pre-canned, there is no appreciation of the interplay between the players, and the ethics of karaoke night demand polite applause for even the most gawdawful bawling performance. It cheapens the craft enormously, besides taking away performing opportunities for true musicians.
        And yes, I do get that it 'democratizes" music and allows for more people to actively participate.  But as a musician who slaved for a lot of my life over my music, I can't fully embrace amateur hour.

        Last full month in which the average daily temperature did not exceed twentieth-century norms: 2/1985 - Harper's Index, 2/2013

        by kamarvt on Fri May 17, 2013 at 05:17:16 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  I've been told somewhere (0+ / 0-)

      that Sousa was asked what he thought about recordings right after his first recording was published. His answer was something like "it is the destruction of music education"

      "labor is superior of capital and deserves much the higher consideration,"... Theodore Roosevelt

      by HugoDog on Thu May 16, 2013 at 03:45:36 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Very well put, (5+ / 0-)

      not to mentioned recently experienced, during a band rehearsal this past week:

      if IM on the band stand comping behind a sax player who decides to augment the chord changes in a particular and unusual way, I dont freak out and say "hey...dickhead...that supposed to be a Cminor6 chord!" but instead I adjust to the situation and maybe play the f#minor to B7 that he was trying to imply.
      This ability to adjust, I believe, is what created such great jazz from the likes of Miles, Monk, and Mingus.

      There is no such thing as a dumb question, but there is such a thing as too many dumb questions that arise from not having listened to the answer of the first question.

      by bsmechanic on Thu May 16, 2013 at 10:19:25 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site