Skip to main content

View Diary: The AP Phone Records, the Press, and the Devil's Bargain (45 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  I think we're talking about the same thing (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lunachickie, cotterperson, kurt, lotlizard

    But from different angles. A free press as a check on government is an essential part of our system - but what of a press that has been corrupted? What remedy for that?

    I'm not calling for reporters to give up confidentiality of their sources; I'm calling for them to act when those sources prove to be intentionally deceptive.

    The corruption of the press when reporters are not allowed to do their job is just as big a problem, and one I alluded to.

    It's an even more troubling observation in light of the corporatization of the media, which treats the gathering and dissemination of news increasingly less as a civic duty to provide an informed citizenry in favor of providing infotainment to dumbed-down consumers in order to sell their eyeballs to advertisers. Not to mention keeping shareholders happy.
    The model of a free press as a check on government works better with a John Peter Zenger than it does with a Rupert Murdoch or a William Randolph Hearst.

    "No special skill, no standard attitude, no technology, and no organization - no matter how valuable - can safely replace thought itself."

    by xaxnar on Fri May 17, 2013 at 01:59:26 PM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  I didn't think that was your bottom line (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      xaxnar, kurt, lotlizard

      but if you lost anyone along the way, you might have lost them not far in, and probably right about where I quoted from. So the clarity is really helpful :)

      I'm not calling for reporters to give up confidentiality of their sources; I'm calling for them to act when those sources prove to be intentionally deceptive.

      The corruption of the press when reporters are not allowed to do their job is just as big a problem

      Hell yeah it is! But honestly, for that corruption to be remedied, shouldn't the employment law finding be addressed first? It would definitely seem to, from a "chicken vs. the egg" perspective. Many reporters wouldn't act when/if they learn that sources have been intentionally deceptive, unless they have some sort of reasonable assurance somewhere, from somebody (or some thing), that they won't lose their jobs.

      Which is, btw, why I found this revelation from Major Garrett so completely stunning. He's a friggin' White House correspondent, and unless I missed an announcement, he still has his CBS job! That would shoot to hell the convenient spin I always see, wherein it is hypothesized that many of these reporters won't push back because they don't want to lose their precious access to the Administration (or whoever's access is precious to the vast majority of them this week...).

      "The “Left” is NOT divided on the need to oppose austerity and the Great Betrayal. The Third Way is not left or center or even right. It is Wall Street on the Potomac."--Bill Black

      by lunachickie on Fri May 17, 2013 at 02:19:58 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Freedom of the press is largely meaningless... (0+ / 0-)

      ...under end-stage capitalism, where the press is controlled by large corporations whose eyes are on ratings and profits, and who value truth and accuracy only as far as they translate into dollars. Wall Street would invest in Der Stürmer if it saw money in it.

      By poking the AP, the Administration has kicked the proverbial hornets' nest; the mainstream media, while all too willing to ignore violations of the rights of bloggers and the like, aren't going to be happy when it is their own ox being gored.

      As far as I'm concerned, it couldn't happen to a nicer bunch of fellows, unless maybe the IRS were to start harrassing some more Tea Party groups.

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site