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View Diary: Legendary Stormchaser, Son, and Partner killed chasing during Oklahoma tornado outbreak (127 comments)

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  •  Except that government and industry is much more (11+ / 0-)

    likely to fund that latest weaponry than they are scientific research. Just look at the cuts in funding NOAA and The National Institutes of Health have had to endure over the last years.

    Storm chasing is not a get rich quick scheme for those serious about the science.

    This is how Tim described his financing in his last interview for National Geographic.

    How do you make a living at it?

    That's kind of the tough part. If I had this great idea to build a weapon to put on a tank, I would have all kinds of money.

    But for weather research, it's tougher to get funding. I survive on some small snippets from government funding, media funding. I try to make the dollars stretch.

    These instruments are expensive, but I do a lot of the design and building myself. All the instruments I use I've designed and built myself, with the exception maybe of high-speed cameras. (Watch a video of Samaras talking about his work.)

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/...

    "Compassion is not weakness, and concern for the unfortunate is not socialism." Hubert H. Humphrey

    by Onomastic on Sun Jun 02, 2013 at 02:05:58 PM PDT

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    •  Was he doing his own free-lance research? Who was (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Onomastic

      using his data?

      Storm chasing is not a get rich quick scheme for those serious about the science.
      Was it going into some overall scheme of weather research?  I seriously am curious how the data was being used.

      "The law is meant to be my servant and not my master, still less my torturer and my murderer." -- James Baldwin. July 11, 1966.

      by YucatanMan on Sun Jun 02, 2013 at 05:41:16 PM PDT

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      •  From Dr. Jeff Masters' honoring of Tim today. (5+ / 0-)
        Tornado science loses a pioneer
        Tim Samaras had been a tornado scientist for over 25 years. He was the founder of TWISTEX, the Tactical Weather Instrumented Sampling in Tornadoes Experiment, a 2011 field experiment designed to help learn more about tornadoes and increase lead time for warnings, which resulted in many peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. One of Tim Samaras' most widely recognized contributions to tornado science is his placement of an aerodynamically-designed probe in the path of an EF-4 tornado near Manchester, South Dakota on June 24, 2003. The probe measured a world-record pressure fall of 100 mb over a 40 second period.

        One of the publications from the TWISTEX program, "Near-Ground Pressure and Wind Measurements in Tornadoes" recounts this close call Tim had in a tornado in 2011: "As the storm approached, the crew noted that the supercell was moving more sharply to the right of its former course, placing them near the projected path of the low-level mesocyclone. The crew drove south on Highway 259, attempting to position south of the low-level mesocyclone before it crossed the highway. With considerable tree cover in this region hampering the visual observation of the storm's features, TWISTEX crews could not position south of the mesocyclone on Highway 259 before the mesocyclone reached this road. Thus, the two mobile mesonet stations, M2 and M3, had an unplanned tornado encounter with a developing tornadic circulation while the mesonet was traveling south on Highway 259."

         photo samaras_pressdrop_zps57452fc5.gif

        Figure 3. One of Tim Samaras' most widely recognized contributions to tornado science is his placement of an aerodynamically-designed probe in the path of an EF-4 tornado near Manchester, South Dakota on June 24, 2003. The probe measured a world-record pressure fall of 100 mb over a 40 second period. See the NWS article and conference paper on the event. Thanks to wunderground member Scott Lincoln for this link.

        http://www.wunderground.com/...

        It's an excellent tribute and there is much more if you are interested.

        "Compassion is not weakness, and concern for the unfortunate is not socialism." Hubert H. Humphrey

        by Onomastic on Sun Jun 02, 2013 at 07:37:43 PM PDT

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      •  And here is the link to the NWS article on (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        YucatanMan, CA ridebalanced

        Tim's recording of a record pressure drop within a tornado.  

        **Below is an account from Tim Samaras, an electrical engineer who has been working on a tornado research project with the assistance of NOAA, The National Geographic Society (NGS), and Applied Research Associates, Inc.  
        http://www.crh.noaa.gov/...

        "Compassion is not weakness, and concern for the unfortunate is not socialism." Hubert H. Humphrey

        by Onomastic on Sun Jun 02, 2013 at 07:43:30 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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