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View Diary: Last night in Istanbul... this is amazing. (142 comments)

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  •  Can you imagine (9+ / 0-)

    something like this in the cities of the US?  Suburbs?  I wonder if some churches would ring their bells too.


    "Justice is a commodity"

    by joanneleon on Sun Jun 02, 2013 at 04:31:37 PM PDT

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    •  Remember, Here 40% Think We're the Fascists (5+ / 0-)

      so no I cannot imagine it.

      Some places in CA, maybe Eugene OR, and scattered towns but we don't have the math for general popular protest.

      Neither did Blacks back in the 50's but we need analogues of actions they took given the numbers they had to work with in the beginning.

      We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

      by Gooserock on Sun Jun 02, 2013 at 04:38:28 PM PDT

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      •  I don't know Goose (5+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        llywrch, joanneleon, hooper, AoT, flowerfarmer

        We could do a heck of a lot of horn honking and lights going out in protest....Flash mobs happen and it wouldn't take long for them to disconnect our internet but a coordinatd effort and it could happen....A certain time every night alternating and you know what they say...Squeaky wheels get the grease.  If we couldn't do this a national strike would be absolutely not doable.   I think we should think about it some.

        We the People have to make a difference and the Change.....Just do it ! Be part of helping us build a veteran community online. United Veterans of America

        by Vetwife on Sun Jun 02, 2013 at 04:53:33 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  But 60 percent could make a difference (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        joanneleon, AoT

        We the People have to make a difference and the Change.....Just do it ! Be part of helping us build a veteran community online. United Veterans of America

        by Vetwife on Sun Jun 02, 2013 at 04:55:13 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  40% think the president is fascist (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        joanneleon

        In part because of the reasons that we think the country is fucked right now. Right-wing resistance to the nwo is based around real fears of globalization. Occupy had broad support from right and left when it started because it opposed the collusion of government and business.

        If debt were a moral issue then, lacking morals, corporations could never be in debt.

        by AoT on Sun Jun 02, 2013 at 09:30:29 PM PDT

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    •  What I can imagine is people being arrested (6+ / 0-)

      for banging on pots and pans, here in America.

      I think it's great that ordinary Turkish people seem to have found a peaceful, impossible-to-ignore method of expressing their anger at the misdeeds of their government. But I'm not sure that the government/police would put up with it in America. Creating lots of noise in residential neighborhoods to express a political point of view would likely result in arrest in this country.

      What I would like to know is why it would be treated differently in America compared to in other countries such as Turkey. What is it about the psychology or governmental systems of other countries that enables them to have successful protest movements which the police choose not to stop, while in the US any such movement is crushed?

      I mean, the Turkish protest is about whether or not the government should be able to build a shopping mall on a historic park. Here in America, can we even imagine a protest sparking the support of masses of people, over an issue as small as that? In this country, even major issues such as rampant corruption of the financial system cannot generate a protest that involves more than a small number of committed activists. There seems to be something very strange about America compared to other nations, regarding the specific matter of public political protests, but I'm not sure what is the cause of the difference.

      The most serious problem in American politics today is that people with wrong ideas are uncompromising, and people with good ideas are submissive and unwilling to fight. Change that, and we might have a real democracy again.

      by Eric Stetson on Sun Jun 02, 2013 at 05:37:50 PM PDT

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      •  One cause is our hyper-individualism (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Vetwife

        Its 'every man for himself' in Amurka.
        Look our for your own. Dont help anyone. Dont get involved.
        We're all trained to cling to our miserable rungs on the economic ladder so desperately, on the whole we're pretty timid.
        Some try to compensate for feeling fearful and helpless by hiding behind personal basement arsenals.
        But as they say in Tx, "all hat and no cattle".

      •  The shopping mall (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mconvente, katiec

        was just the spark and just the tip of the iceberg, from what I'm reading and hearing.

        I mean, the Turkish protest is about whether or not the government should be able to build a shopping mall on a historic park.
        You'll find a lot of analysis about what this is really about.  Plus, even if it was just about the shopping mall, did you see what happened to the peaceful protesters in the park?  That alone is enough to spark a huge outcry.  


        "Justice is a commodity"

        by joanneleon on Mon Jun 03, 2013 at 06:10:15 AM PDT

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    •  Was 2010 really that long ago? (0+ / 0-)

      No memories of Madison, Ann Arbor, or Columbus?

      •  I'm wondering (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        AoT, flowerfarmer, Hubbard Squash

        if you read the diary.  We're talking about people in apartment buildings and homes, in the night, through the night, standing in solidarity in their windows and doorways with protesters.  

        Yes, of course we remember Madison.  If there were people banging pots and pans throughout an entire city, many cities, and turning their lights on and off in solidarity, I didn't hear about it.  I'd be happy to hear that it did happen.  I was in NYC for a lot of Occupy events.  It was not uncommon for people to beep their horns in solidarity.  Double decker tour buses loved Occupy and cheered and waved when they drove by.  But in the windows of the buildings, I would see people looking out of the windows, but no pots and pans or lights and no signal of solidarity. Sometimes when the marches went uptown people along the streets would be by the doors and would high five protesters as would some drivers in the street. But I did not see these kinds of signals of solidarity from within the homes, widespread and loud and impossible to ignore.  

        Did you?  I thought I made that pretty clear, but it's always possible that the message did not come across as I intended.  Or it's always possible they you find a way to disagree and derail in a lot of my diaries and sometimes it seems like you didn't even read them. So there's that...


        "Justice is a commodity"

        by joanneleon on Sun Jun 02, 2013 at 07:34:49 PM PDT

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        •  I just see (0+ / 0-)

          countless references to OWS here on DK but these days I don't see the shout-outs to the Midwestern protests. And this is a general observation of DK on the whole, not just designed to apply to you.

          And yes, I saw thousands of acts of expression here in WI. More in support of the recall effort but plenty PLENTY also in support of retaining Gov Walker.

          •  Well, I'd say in large part (0+ / 0-)

            that's because the Wisconsin protests were pretty much a complete failure. I wish it weren't so, but that's how it played out. People reference OWS because it managed to change at least the rhetorical landscape on a national scale. We could argue about any other potential successes, but there was that one. I didn't see any successes come out of Wisconsin. It only seems to be getting worse there now with no end in sight.

            If debt were a moral issue then, lacking morals, corporations could never be in debt.

            by AoT on Mon Jun 03, 2013 at 10:20:06 AM PDT

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