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View Diary: Dallas Tea Party leader: "The Republican Party doesn't want black people to vote..." (updatedx2) (130 comments)

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  •  I'll be honest (0+ / 0-)

    I don't have a problem with his statement.

    He didn't say: "Republicans don't want black people to BE ABLE TO vote."

    He said: "Republicans don't want black people to vote if ..."

    Which is completely reasonable. And defensible strategy. I read and wrote a lot about voter turnout last November. I didn't want 50-year old white Baptists to vote then. Or in any other election. I hope they stay home.

    That's much different than saying I don't want 50-year old white Baptists to be able to vote.

    Language matters. And preciseness matters. I don't like reading words into a statement that are not there.

    "We forward in this generation, triumphantly."

    by Grizzard on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 10:40:56 PM PDT

    •  I should preface my statements (0+ / 0-)

      by saying that I understand that a lot of Republicans are working to make it so that black people aren't able to vote.

      But that's a related, yet different question than the one posed by this guy's statements.

      "We forward in this generation, triumphantly."

      by Grizzard on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 10:45:32 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I do have a problem with that statement. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Oh Mary Oh, balancedscales, Ahianne

      And I never claimed that Emanuelson said he didn't want black people to be able to vote.

      The full audio file is here: https://soundcloud.com/...

      In there, Emanuelson is leading a session on grassroots organizing and what needs to be done to turn out people to vote. Toward the end of his session, a woman asks this (all emphasis mine throughout):

      What are we doing to bring in younger voters?
      Emanuelson's reply is engaged and detailed as he says they're going to learn from "what the Democrats have been doing" and talks for almost a minute about the GOP plans to address the need to bring in younger voters.

      The very next question is the one I quoted in the diary:

      "What are the Republicans doing to get black people to vote?"

      In his reply, Emanuelson pivots away from his focus throughout the session on doing:

      "Well, I'm going to be real honest with you: The Republican Party doesn't want black people to vote, if they're going to vote 9 to 1 for Democrats."
      Stop and think about that. He didn't answer the question regarding what Republicans are doing; instead, he immediately replied with what "the Republican Party" doesn't want, perhaps because he couldn't talk about their intentionally discriminatory gerrymandering efforts, which is what they're doing. I would also argue that it would be one thing to talk about Republicans in general (as you did), but quite another to "be real honest" and present without hesitation "the Republican Party's" position regarding not wanting black people to vote.

      Even the man who asked that question regarding black people was frustrated by Emanuelson's dismissive reply, and as that man continued to press him, it became clear that there is no grassroots plan in regards to black voters, or at least there isn't a plan that Emanuelson could discuss.

      And if his statement should not be an issue, why did the Texas Tribune report this?

      Emanuelson's earlier comments had provoked a storm of criticism from Democrats and a rebuke from the chairman of the state GOP, Steve Munisteri, who said they did not reflect his position or the party's.
      Finally, I agree:
      Language matters. And preciseness matters. I don't like reading words into a statement that are not there.
      What I've tried to do is to draw your attention to the words that are there in an effort to show you how his language (and attitude) changed when the topic of black people voting was brought up. Like so many other instances where Republicans' comments have backfired (Romney's 47% remarks come to mind), Emanuelson forgot that his "real honest" statement could be made public.

      "Compassion is not weakness, and concern for the unfortunate is not socialism." Hubert H. Humphrey

      by nomandates on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 02:02:37 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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