Skip to main content

View Diary: Getting to Know Your Solar System (37): Titan (Vol. 3) (44 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  That's a longer-term measure. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    CalGal47, Khun David

    The first few centuries of Martian terraformation would be focused on raising the temperature and releasing oxygen from the regolith.  Getting out to the Oort Cloud for a comet seems a bit challenging compared to getting people on Mars with some industrial machinery to spew heat and process rocks.  The Voyager and Pioneer probes we launched decades ago won't be in the Oort Cloud until like the 22nd century.

    Nothing makes a Republican angrier than a smile on a poor child's face.

    by Troubadour on Sun Jun 16, 2013 at 09:17:53 PM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  We don't need to go to the Oort cloud (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Troubadour

      Kuiper belt objects should have sufficient water and other volatiles.

      Nitrogen is far more common universally than argon (although about as common as neon).  Neon and argon don't chemically react very well, so they are not apt to bind to solids, so they would be more likely to disperse from the atmosphere than chemically active elements, like oxygen and nitrogen.

      Also, nitrogen is absolutely required for terrestrial life, as it is necessary for amino acid and nucleotide synthesis, as part of the nitrogen cycle.  

      Sigline? What Sigline?

      by Khun David on Mon Jun 17, 2013 at 05:55:12 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Hmm, hadn't realized that. Good points. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Khun David

        Now that I think about it, you probably don't even have to go to the Kuiper Belt.  Centaurs would probably work.

        Nothing makes a Republican angrier than a smile on a poor child's face.

        by Troubadour on Mon Jun 17, 2013 at 06:35:00 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site