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View Diary: Woman sexually assaulted in Nevada courtroom (154 comments)

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  •  Right but (5+ / 0-)

    my experiences are with small suburban police forces where there is relatively little crime and relationships are (as for as I know) cordial.  Mostly our police do traffic surveillance and direct traffic at various events.  So as far as I know there is very little opportunity for that.

    And I don't know any more beyond my personal experiences in the matter.  So conceivably there could be decent numbers of professional and upstanding officers.  And there are plenty of indications that this is missing in many places.  I am willing to bet if I discussed this incident with the ones I know they would be appalled and would immediately state that the marshall was in the wrong.  They wouldn't go as far as validate the assault claim but I doubt they would accept his actions as valid.  It seems obvious that in this case we have a major issue and a serial violator.  He was so cocksure he could get her to recant on the record by bullying her.  Sickening.

    "You have attributed conditions to villainy that simply result from stupidity"

    by newfie on Tue Jun 11, 2013 at 10:19:24 AM PDT

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    •  Trust me, you can NOT judge by your own (23+ / 0-)

      interactions with them!!!!!  They pick and choose who they intimidate and whose rights they violate.  I'm treated wonderfully by them.  Then again I'm an attorney.  I get to see how they treat others who are have less power on a regular basis, and it's not good.  Not good at all.  And those are the very same cops that are so friendly and courteous to me.

      "If you trust you are not critical; if you are critical you do not trust" by our own Dauphin

      by gustynpip on Tue Jun 11, 2013 at 01:32:09 PM PDT

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      •  I tire of trying to explain what it is like (12+ / 0-)

        In America's ghettos. Watching Occupy protesters being attacked did not only bother me because of that moment's brutality but because of it being a trigger to events of the past.

      •  Yes I understand that. (0+ / 0-)

        That is what I meant by having met a few with whom my experience was positive but my senses told me that the officer would be different with others.

        So you haven't met a cop whom you are pretty confident would generally treat others the same?

        "You have attributed conditions to villainy that simply result from stupidity"

        by newfie on Wed Jun 12, 2013 at 04:14:40 AM PDT

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        •  No, I haven't. People are people and we're (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Damnit Janet

          all influenced by those around us.  When those around us are targeting the poor and the powerless and getting applauded for it, getting promotions for it, etc., it takes an incredibly strong person not to buy into it to at least some extent.  And I don't see people who go into law enforcement very often having that kind of strength.  I don't know that all those who behave like this do so because they're "bad" people, but I do think every single one of them will treat those with some level of power differently than they will treat the powerless.  And if they get kudos, promotions, etc. for treating them poorly, they'll be more likely to treat them even more poorly.

          Nope.  There's not one single one, including those I personally like a lot, who I believe treat everyone equally or even close to equally or whom I would trust to not abuse their power over those they feel "deserve" that abuse.  

          Nor do I trust a single one of them to not lie when they get on the stand.  Their philosophy is that they know the person is guilty, so it's okay for them to lie because their lying assures that justice will be done.

          Keep in mind that I don't have any ax to grind or any personal animosity against police officers.  I personally like many of those I know and think many live admirable personal lives.  However, in their professional lives, I wouldn't trust one of them farther than I could throw them.

          "If you trust you are not critical; if you are critical you do not trust" by our own Dauphin

          by gustynpip on Wed Jun 12, 2013 at 04:47:24 AM PDT

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          •  Sad n/t. (0+ / 0-)

            "You have attributed conditions to villainy that simply result from stupidity"

            by newfie on Wed Jun 12, 2013 at 05:09:20 AM PDT

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            •  But true. (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Damnit Janet

              "If you trust you are not critical; if you are critical you do not trust" by our own Dauphin

              by gustynpip on Wed Jun 12, 2013 at 05:36:38 AM PDT

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              •  Both sad & true (0+ / 0-)

                I understand what you have been seeing, gustynpip, because I've seen it my entire life.  When I was a very little girl (late 60s, early 70s) my grandfather opened a bail bond company.  I spent many, MANY hours sitting on the corner of the courtesy desk in the jailors' office of the county jail.  I played with paper, staplers, tape, stamp pads, and other office supplies while my grandfather wrote bail bonds.  It was no big deal that a bail agent and his granddaughter were hanging out in the jailors office.  

                Around 1980 everything changed-- new sheriff, a jail office remodel including new bullet-proof glass "public information" windows with an automated drawer like the drive up window at the bank, the glass enclosed office got "privacy" glass and they prohibited sharing the office (or even providing a workspace) with bondsmen out of professional courtesy.  After that agents had to fill out their dozen or so forms on the sides of their briefcases resting in their laps, while sitting on a narrow wood bench mounted right up against the concrete block wall.  Trust me when I say it was torture.  But the point is, I grew up listening to the office banter and then watched as the whole tone toward the public, and even bail agents-- officers of the court, turned around 180 degrees.  Suddenly everyone was a suspect and all the cops' conversations had to be held in secret behind locked doors, even if they were only talking about the weather, yet the waiting room was actually bugged.  So much for client confidentiality!  

                I can't help but notice that most, if not all, of these changes came to pass during the Reagan administration-- a time of great fortune for law enforcement.  Revenue was shifted directly from social programs to law enforcement, particularly all of their "special units" like SWAT teams and "war on drugs" teams of various stripes.  Worse, it's been tipping ever farther in that same direction in the 30 years since.  And now we wonder how law enforcement got to be so sideways!

                “The end of democracy and the defeat of the American Revolution will occur when government falls into the hands of lending institutions and moneyed incorporations.” ~ Thomas Jefferson | My Political Compass Test Score -8.50, -5.33

                by caliblue on Fri Jun 14, 2013 at 07:46:07 PM PDT

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    •  Character is what you are in the dark (14+ / 0-)

      not what you are when everyone is looking.

      Of course they would condemn the cop in the video, the guy's crimes are now public. I am sure if you spoke to the other"marshal" in the video tape, and showed him a similar situation involving other cops, he would condemn what happened. However, when it happened in his presence, he AND THE JUDGE aided and abetted criminal abuse of power.

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