Skip to main content

View Diary: More white people died than were born, GOP policies whittling them down (256 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  It's a good thing (14+ / 0-)

    they haven't tried to build that fence on the Canadian border...

    •  Although the Canadians might consider (28+ / 0-)

      building one themselves.

      "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

      by LaFeminista on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 10:37:07 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

        •  Probably hoping Real Murikins cant find (10+ / 0-)

          Canada anyway.

          "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

          by LaFeminista on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 10:43:22 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Just listen for the sound of "oot" (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            a gilas girl, CoyoteMarti, BachFan, Matt Z

            and walk thataway.

            Economics is a social *science*. Can we base future economic decisions on math? @AardvarkBlue on Twitter.

            by blue aardvark on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 11:17:24 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  So, we can now (5+ / 0-)

            say that the electorate is like Global Warming.

            It's changing a helluva lot faster than anyone predicted.....

            "If fighting for a more equal and equitable distribution of the wealth of this country is socialistic, I stand guilty of being a socialist." Walter Reuther

            by fugwb on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 11:34:03 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  Canada doesn't want any Real Murikins (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Aquarius40, exreaganite, grover

            unless they are young with skills in demand.

            •  Even then, Canada prefers Americans (0+ / 0-)

              who don't call themselves Real Murikins.

              Unless, of course, they're moving to Alberta, eh?

              © grover


              So if you get hit by a bus tonight, would you be satisfied with how you spent today, your last day on earth? Live like tomorrow is never guaranteed, because it's not. -- Me.

              by grover on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 11:56:36 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  Not necessarily (0+ / 0-)

              Each province has its own provincial nominee program. The province identifies who they want and submits the names to Canada Immigration. These are not necessarily people who would succeed if they applied directly to CIC themselves.

              Some provinces focus on working with employers and submitting the the names of people employers want. Alberta, for example.

              Some provinces accept applications directly from aspiring immigrants.

              For example, Manitoba's program appears to be open to older applicants, not just young ones, which is good since they're trying to attract families. They want to know about job skills, too.  One catch is that they expect most applicants to have some tie to Manitoba: family, friends, university education, employment, etc.

              But Manitoba is willing to invite some people to go through their PNP even without connections.

              Provincial nominees are processed through Canada Immigration--but not through CIC's point system.

              I suspect Manitoba's objective in requiring connections to the province is that they don't want people to use the MPNP to get permanent residence in Canada, and then immediately move elsewhere. They nominate people who want to live in Manitoba.

              All provinces except Quebec have provincial nominee programs, with websites. Quebec has its own immigration service. Anybody who is fluent in French should consider applying through Quebec's program.

              •  Another option-student first, then residence (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                elfling, FutureNow

                Manitoba encourages potential skilled workers to come to the province first as students, and then to apply to the provincial nominee program so that they can stay on as permanent residents after graduation.

                Manitoba offers enticements. It has a rebate program on tuition: 60% rebate by way of provincial taxes.  

                What might have been especially attractive to Americans--before Obamacare--is that a student and family is covered by provincial health care.

                I'm talking about Manitoba because it is the one program I just looked up online to see what they're up to now. I don't have time to look up PNPs in other provinces to see what they're doing these days. Some might be similar or better--some might be less helpful for individual applicants.

                For Alberta: somebody would have to get a job, first, and then let the employer make the pitch to the PNP.

              •  But but but Manitoba.......??? Not sure that is a (0+ / 0-)

                big improvement.

                •  Sometimes warm people trump cold climates (0+ / 0-)

                  edr, I've looked at the PNPs for all provinces in the past (for someone else), but I didn't have time to do this again. I mentioned Manitoba because that's the only one I had time to look at.

                  People vary in what they consider to be a great place to live. I know people who have loved living in Canada's far north---the more north it was, the happier they were. They couldn't get enough of 23-hour sunshine or 23-hour nighttime up there; or the extremely chilly winters; or the high cost of living. But it wouldn't be me opting for that.

                  Somebody who considers the Lower Mainland of BC about the only tolerable place to live within Canada--or maybe downtown Toronto--will not be interested in Manitoba. But then again, will BC or Ontario be interested in helping them get permanent residence in Canada? Sure, if they're surgeons, I guess--but maybe not so much the families with less exalted trades.

                  I think Manitoba has added those "ties to Manitoba" provisions because they want to be sure that applicants are well aware that, for example, the province gets mighty cold in the wintertime.

                  But some good things about Manitoba:
                  - Nice people.
                  - Lots of progressives, who might be NDP or Green or Liberal.
                  - Looks like they're doing a lot better with jobs and the economy than a whole of places in the U.S.
                  - Provincial health care, better than a whole lot of places in the U.S.

                  I live in Alberta, which is doing very well on the jobs and the economy front, and it has a lot of nice people, but it gets really cold in the winter and has a shortage of politically progressive people.

                  Let me give you an example of why I think Manitoba is a remarkably decent and fair-minded province. In most of Canada, temporary foreign workers are welcomed in, work for a couple years, and then get sent home.

                  Manitoba figures that it is the workers who are considered temporary, not the jobs. So a temporary foreign worker lucky enough to work in Manitoba is given the opportunity to apply to the provincial nominee program after they've been in the province for a year or thereabouts. If the person has done well (language, law-abiding, that kind of thing), Manitoba will help them get permanent residence through PNP.

                  As far as I know, Alberta's not doing that, or BC: they're happy to see TFWs come and TFWs go. High-end employees might get help--petroleum engineers for example--but people in the middle, not so much.

                  So someone who has thought about immigrating to Canada to find a job, health care, good education, and so forth, could do a lot worse than look at a province like Manitoba, which wants families to move there and is willing to help make that happen.

          •  They'd get all huffy when they watch a (2+ / 0-)

            Canadian football game in -27 weather.  And what's this? Metric?

            Why are the signs in French?

            Canada is safe.

            © grover


            So if you get hit by a bus tonight, would you be satisfied with how you spent today, your last day on earth? Live like tomorrow is never guaranteed, because it's not. -- Me.

            by grover on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 11:55:26 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  Yeah, even Justin Bieber realizes the benefits of (5+ / 0-)

        the Canadian healthcare system. In some interview he stated he was not interested in becoming an American citizen because he'd have to renounce the excellent healthcare available to him as a Canadian.

        So, to all you baggers out there, chew on this. Justin Bieber, pre-20, has more sense/smarts than you.

        “The genius of our ruling class is that it has kept a majority of the people from ever questioning the inequity of a system where most people drudge along paying heavy taxes for which they get nothing in return.” - Gore Vidal

        by Hanging Up My Tusks on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 11:35:36 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  He hasn't tried the dual-citizenship route? (0+ / 0-)
          •  Not that I know of - really don't follow him, (0+ / 0-)

            just happened to see (and note) his comment on disparity between healthcare available in USA and Canada. Really impressed me at the time because (iirc this was a year or so ago) someone as young as Bieber had already figured it out. Obviously it doesn't take a rocket scientist.

            “The genius of our ruling class is that it has kept a majority of the people from ever questioning the inequity of a system where most people drudge along paying heavy taxes for which they get nothing in return.” - Gore Vidal

            by Hanging Up My Tusks on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 12:44:39 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  made me smile, your comment (1+ / 0-)

      as does your name, Pat

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site