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View Diary: Thomas E. Woods, Jr. And the Right to Oppress (18 comments)

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  •  When states legalize Pot, isn't that a form of (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Frank Cocozzelli

    nullification?

    The most important way to protect the environment is not to have more than one child.

    by nextstep on Tue Jun 18, 2013 at 08:06:27 AM PDT

    •  Depends (3+ / 0-)
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      sfbob, SeaTurtle, Aaa T Tudeattack

      If the local police choose not to prosecute while obstructing federal authorities from doing so, yes, that is nullification. Indeed, Woods and his Tenth Amendment Center is using the drug legalization issue as bait to lure in folks who would otherwise reject nullification.

      It is very much a dangerous trap. Is the fraying of the Union worth pot legalization? I, for one, don't think so. But that is why I believe that if the drug war is to end it must be done on the federal level.

      Sometimes self-discipline must carry the day.

      •  But states don't have to enforce federal laws (0+ / 0-)

        New York State repealed it's state prohibition law before the 21st Amendment passed and was within it's rights to do so as long as they didn't obstruct the federal Prohibition Bureau. And yes that let the NY speakeasies operate with relative impunity.

        “If you can convince the lowest white man he’s better than the best colored man, he won’t notice you’re picking his pocket. Hell, give him somebody to look down on, and he’ll empty his pockets for you.” Lyndon Baines Johnson

        by spacecadet1 on Tue Jun 18, 2013 at 02:09:18 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Not necessarily (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      spacecadet1, Ahianne

      Remember, not everything that is illegal at a federal level is (or can be) illegal at the state level.

      When Colorado legalizes pot, they are saying 'there are no longer any state laws against it'. And they may also be saying 'we don't think there should be federal laws against it'. But unless they are saying 'the federal government is prohibited from enforcing marijuana laws in Colorado, and any federal official who does so will be arrested' or something like that, it's not nullification.

      Another example would be hate crime legislation. Lots of states don't have it, but the federal government does. That doesn't mean that the states are nullifying the hate crimes law, it just means that it is illegal at a federal level but not at a state level.

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