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View Diary: Superman Don’t Weep for Collateral Damage (32 comments)

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  •  I forgot to mention;this is how comics are now too (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW, Dr Erich Bloodaxe RN, cynndara

    I've been a comic fan my whole life, and for years subscribed to as many as 15 titles at a time (DC recently, haven't liked the Marvel stories since the '60s) - but over the past few years the stories have been getting more violent, especially with DC's 'reboot' of their universe with the 'New 52', which is just awful. It's just incredibly bleak, vicious, with no 'good', only the anti-hero types, and every comic issue involves mass destruction and the deaths of dozens, hundreds, or even thousands of innocents. The 'underground' comic world took over the mainstream, and it carries over into the films. You can see the difference in the philosophies of what superheroes used to be just by looking at Superman's costume; in the Reeves films, it was bright, clear red and blue. In 'Man of Steel' it's much darker, with muddied, muddled colors - to reflect the uncertain morals of the modern superhero.

    It has to start somewhere. It has to start sometime. What better place than here, what better time than now? - Guerilla Radio, Rage Against The Machine.

    by Fordmandalay on Tue Jun 18, 2013 at 09:01:16 AM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  I suspect (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cynndara

      the desaturated palette was more about not looking like the Marvel universe. The Avengers was all about primary and signature colors Iron Man is red and gold, Hulk is green, Cap is red, white and blue (and so is Thor), Loki is green and gold, Hawkeye and Black Widow dress in matching blacks, and so on.

      Supes' new costume reflects a modern sensibility in cinema: desaturate and texturize. Like the Lord of the RIngs movies: As each one came out it was less colorful than the last. If they had made a fourth in the series, I believe it would have been in black and white.

      I like the fact that Superman no longer wears his underpants on the outside. And they kind of made the point that his uniform is a sort of Kryptonian chain mail armor. I'm OK with all that.

      I don't read comics anymore, but I suspect your analysis is spot on. More's the pity.

      •  Which goes back (0+ / 0-)

        to something I've noticed increasing geometrically in film and video since my childhood: the people who do film live in a video world.  They admire, consume, imitate and recreate other films.  IF IT ISN'T ON FILM, FORGET IT.  It's not on their radar.  They don't read, they don't write, and their scripts have to be re-written as comic books for production (the infamous "storybook").  Hollywood is basically composed of illiterates who learn everything they know from film and TV.  Therefore their fashionable aesthetics mutate and comment upon the latest fashion in film, but take no notice of either the real world or any intellectual or historical information that would have to enter their consciousness by a medium other than video.  They live inside an Idiot Box Bubble.

    •  creeping cynicism (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cynndara

      In this respect, the comics are simply following in a shift in the culture as a whole: towards cynicism but also towards realism.  The time when audiences could uncritically accept a superpowered being acting beyond all restraint except a self-imposed moral code is long past.  We've learned that someone in that position is likely to be far more worthy of fear than of love: real "supers" would probably be like Khan Noonien Singh, and even the good ones would be constantly tempted to go Justice Lord on the world whenever law or morality interferes with their effectiveness.

      And while the heroes themselves get more complex and fragile, you also see the rise of people and institutions charged with controlling supers if possible, destroying them if necessary, but also acting in defense of Earth when (not if) the supers are unavailable or refuse to act because their moral code conflicts with what humanity sees as in its own interest.  Not just fear but also a real lack of faith in the kind of champion that the supers represent and an interest in cultivating a mundane alternative.

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