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View Diary: Why People Distrust Science (250 comments)

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  •  Simple, Interleukin 17 is partially responsible (3+ / 0-)

    for antibody formation .  A COX-1 inhibitor like tylenol also inhibits the function of IL-17 thus reducing the effectiveness of the immune response.  Yet the CDC still recommends taking tylenol or advil if you have any discomfort/pain from a vaccination so what does that tell you about the CDC?  Or to put it another way, if the choice is between trusting the CDC or a peer reviewed study in The Journal of Immunology who would you trust?

    You have watched Faux News, now lose 2d10 SAN.

    by Throw The Bums Out on Wed Jun 19, 2013 at 11:11:34 PM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  personally, i'm going with the (5+ / 0-)

      peer reviewed study. but then, i'm a licensed prof. in another technical area, so i'm clearly biased towards, you know, facts.  the issue with the CDC is that they don't automatically change information, to keep real-time current with newest data in the field. they will probably get around to changing that recommendation soon, to conform to the peer reviewed study's conclusions. unfortunately, that my well be too late for some child and their parents.

      some vaccines have been known to have serious adverse side-effects. the swine flu vaccine comes to mind. that said, there is no empirical evidence supporting the claim that some vaccines cause autism. none.at all.ever.

      •  However from what I have seen the most (2+ / 0-)

        common adverse side effects are not caused by the vaccination at all, rather improper IM injections given at drugstores and such by poorly trained and regulated "needle monkeys".  Here is a pubmed link for the details.

        Oh, and most doctors and even health departments don't know about that OTC pain reliever issue.  Though to be fair it was just an animal study and needs to be replicated on humans to be sure.

        You have watched Faux News, now lose 2d10 SAN.

        by Throw The Bums Out on Wed Jun 19, 2013 at 11:55:04 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Poor training = Problems (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Throw The Bums Out

          No surprise there.  I once went to a drugstore for my flu vaccine.

          And then watched the nurse look up the amount (fine by me, I approve of doing twice and checking thrice).  Then asking what the amount was of another nurse.  Then asking if "this is right."

          I went elsewhere.  My local pharmacist is great now that he does flu shots, knows what he's doing, has my trust, and I've never had a problem that I didn't expect.  Flu shots make me feel crappy for a day, but I seem to react to them.

          (-6.38, -7.03) Moderate left, moderate libertarian

          by Lonely Liberal in PA on Thu Jun 20, 2013 at 06:46:16 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I always go to the health department as it is (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Lonely Liberal in PA, JerryNA

            actually closer to me than the drugstore.  Which reminds me, I need a tdap booster (with my asthma, pertussis could kill me) once I can wring some answers out of the CDC regarding if I need to wait for a week or two to make sure the effects of any advil are fully out of my system.  Surely there have to be a few immunologists on here who can give me more detailed information and an answer.

            You have watched Faux News, now lose 2d10 SAN.

            by Throw The Bums Out on Thu Jun 20, 2013 at 06:55:27 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  TDaP (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Throw The Bums Out, JerryNA

              Is one of my standards.  Pertussis...I just don't want it.  Diphtheria, ditto.

              Tetanus is actually a minor danger for me.  I'm a gardener and spend most of the summer with something on my hands bleeding.

              I heard from an older nurse friend that, of all the ways to go, tetanus is one of the least pleasant, most painful, completely degrading ones.  And nowadays it's preventable--there's no reason to get tetanus, barring a bad vaccine or extraordinarily improbable bad luck.

              (-6.38, -7.03) Moderate left, moderate libertarian

              by Lonely Liberal in PA on Thu Jun 20, 2013 at 07:26:04 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

      •  I think the main reason (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        JerryNA, samddobermann

        so many parents still believe the vaccine/autism link is that the implication is that there's something you can do, in theory, to stop your child from being autistic.  Otherwise, they have to cope with the fact that something involving their child's health is out of their control.  Also, admitting that vaccines don't cause it narrows down the possible causes even more, opening up the possibility that it may be genetic, to an extent.  Meaning that the parents might feel partly responsible.

    •  Dang (0+ / 0-)

      So, I just had a tetanus shot a couple of days ago and I've been taking naproxen for a banged up shoulder.  Did I just negate the shot?

      •  Depends, it might have negated or reduced the (0+ / 0-)

        effectiveness of the vaccination.  However, if you were given the shot because of possible exposure you were also given the immune globulin which would not be affected.  The real question is just how much does it affect the immune response in humans which as far as I know has never been studied.  I will hopefully be getting some answers from the CDC and the health department shortly.

        You have watched Faux News, now lose 2d10 SAN.

        by Throw The Bums Out on Thu Jun 20, 2013 at 09:29:13 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Hmm (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JerryNA

      CDC recommendations are typically based on multiple peer reviewed studies.

      •  And a healthy helping (0+ / 0-)

        of politics on the side, both national and professional.  I have watched expert committees form a "consensus" that lays inordinate stress on an outlier point of view merely to seek harmony within the group.  They have to live with each other for decades, and therefore will accommodate even the fellow that that all privately agree is a loon.

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