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View Diary: UPDATE x3: LED Lightbulbs Finally Ready for Prime Time! (282 comments)

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  •  There is some junk stuff being sold in both the (12+ / 0-)

    CFL and LED categories, but it sounds like the units you tested were credible. It certainly would be desireable for LED to be rebated for faster market penetration, but I have yet to see that happen.

    There can be no protection locally if we're content to ignore the fact that there are no controls globally.

    by oldpotsmuggler on Sat Jun 22, 2013 at 11:13:14 AM PDT

    •  Yes, I've Got 2 LED Desk Lights Dying On Me (7+ / 0-)

      right now, bought about a year ago. I stopped buying CFL's altogether because so many of them were dying early.

      We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

      by Gooserock on Sat Jun 22, 2013 at 11:31:31 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  CFLs are really bad at on/off cycles (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Mr Robert, Lawrence, pgm 01, cynndara

        I tried them in my bathroom fixture (3 of 6 sockets), and they died faster than regular incandescents. Brand didn't seem to make much difference.

        I've put in two LEDs a couple years ago, and they're still going strong.

        •  I have an incandescent in the bathroom (3+ / 0-)

          because CFL bulbs don't like to be sideways, the don't like heat and humidity and they don't like to be turned on and off frequently.  All of that combines to make a CFL in the bathroom last about as long as an incandescent which makes it too expensive to use there.  I have been looking for a low cost LED that can provide enough light sideways to illuminate the bathroom but the prices have been too high.  

          LED lights are very directional so the original bulbs were very much like a spot light, great if the bulb faces down but bad for what I needed.  Many of the bulbs on the market now do radiate light so I should be able to find a good replacement.  I really don't want to go through the hassle of replacing a light fixture just to get the benefit of modern bulbs.

      •  Agree the life cycle is greatly exaggerated (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        oldpotsmuggler

        I started using LED's 20 years ago, in my business, and found the life of the bulbs very much shorter than promised. The people I bought them from, in Nevada, were very good about replacing them, but finally I called them and discussed the problem. They said there is a problem with fluctuating power sources. Most of us do not have clean, non-fluctuating power, and this can make the LED's burn out early. My latest LED, about 2 years old, has already lost several units.  

        Reality is a good thing to know about, as long as you keep it separate from the Opera we live in

        by greatferm on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 08:33:57 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Unfortunately, the crooks got in the market first (4+ / 0-)

      I have bought LED lights for home and for car tail lights. They all failed rapidly. The crooks make bulbs with poor heatsinks and little or no electrical protection.

      All I know is if you buy bulbs with the Energy Star label, you should be OK.

      I have some flashlights with lithium ion batteries and CREE LEDs. Those things are very high quality and the envy of my friends.

    •  Some states offer rebates (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      oldpotsmuggler

      In MA, I think you can get a certain number of bulbs per year for free, or nearly free after the rebate. In NH, I've seen rebate slips attached to the shelf next to the bulbs. VT offers a variety of rebates, depending on the lighting purpose (indoor, outdoor, commercial, residential), as well as rebates on occupancy sensors, daylight sensors, etc.

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