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View Diary: States with photo ID voter laws should lose seats in Congress (15 comments)

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  •  The question would be one of standing (1+ / 0-)
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    VClib

    i.e. whichever state would stand to pick up Wisconsin's 8th would have such grounds: there would be only one, after all.

    Working with the 2010 census data and the 1941 Apportionment Act, the state with such grounds is North Carolina, which would gain a 14th seat.  Since they've recently added their own photo ID law, they're rather unlikely to want to sue Wisconsin to get it since the precedent would lose them the seat right back (and potentially even more).

    Fake candidates nominated by the GOP for the recalls: 6 out of 7. Fake signatures on the recall petitions: 4 out of 1,860,283.

    by GeoffT on Wed Jun 26, 2013 at 04:52:47 PM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  Presuming the 9.3% rate (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      VClib

      Missouri would have a chance for standing against North Carolina, but MO have a state constitutional amendment for photo ID before the voters in November next year.

      Missouri wouldn't lose any seats if they disenfranchised 9.3% of their adults.

      Yesterday's Shelby v Holder decision allowed Texas' photo ID law to take effect; at the 9.3% rate this would give North Carolina, Missouri and New York standing.

      Fake candidates nominated by the GOP for the recalls: 6 out of 7. Fake signatures on the recall petitions: 4 out of 1,860,283.

      by GeoffT on Wed Jun 26, 2013 at 05:13:05 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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