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View Diary: The Martian Chronicles and the Voting Rights Act (13 comments)

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  •  Yes, but it was "only science fiction", y'know? (4+ / 0-)

    Some of the most cogent sociological commentary of the '50s and '60s was ignored because science fiction fans were "weird". (Well, we were, but...)

    At least half the future I've been expecting hasn't gotten here yet. Sigh.... (Yes, there's gender bias in my name; no, I wasn't thinking about it when I signed up. My apologies.)

    by serendipityisabitch on Wed Jun 26, 2013 at 08:13:25 AM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  Remember the political discussions (2+ / 0-)

      raised by Nevil Shute's In the Wet, in 1953 when he used this mystical novel to introduce a "multiple voting system" in Australia that provided additional votes for people based on their contributions to Australian society? One can see how such a system could be abused, depending on what criteria are used for awarding the votes, but the idea is occasionally mentioned even today. Another example of a mid-20th century novelist taking a look into an "improved" future....

      •  Hadn't read that - in the '50s I was mainly (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        RiveroftheWest, quarkstomper

        reading Heinlein, Norton, and a couple of other 'boys' authors - but I will go hunt for it online. Sounds interesting.

        At least half the future I've been expecting hasn't gotten here yet. Sigh.... (Yes, there's gender bias in my name; no, I wasn't thinking about it when I signed up. My apologies.)

        by serendipityisabitch on Wed Jun 26, 2013 at 04:42:40 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Just a warning... (3+ / 0-)

          Shute had cast off a good many of the racist/classist prejudices he'd grown up with as an upper-middle-class Edwardian, but some of the language is solidly (and shockingly, from our viewpoint) mid-1950s.

          •  Mmmnn - not sure how to put this, but while (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            RiveroftheWest, quarkstomper, Brecht

            I'm not in favor of using any 'ist based insults to or about actual people, I have absolutely no problem with authors who use language consistent with the eras they're describing. If I did, I'd have to give up Kipling, and there's no way that's going to happen.

            At least half the future I've been expecting hasn't gotten here yet. Sigh.... (Yes, there's gender bias in my name; no, I wasn't thinking about it when I signed up. My apologies.)

            by serendipityisabitch on Wed Jun 26, 2013 at 07:31:55 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I agree with you, but I noticed that (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              quarkstomper, Brecht

              some of the language that I breezed over as a teen in the '50s now hits me in a way it didn't back then. I admire Shute for his ability to break boundaries between what he'd grown up with and the "working class," and to recognize universal good in people of different social, economic and religious groups. He did so increasingly as his writing matured.

              Just saying, writing styles have changed....

              •  Quite true. All I can offer is that when I'm (3+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                RiveroftheWest, quarkstomper, Brecht

                reading a book, unless it's pretty bad, I'm totally inside it. As long as the author is consistent in his/her worldview, it doesn't bother me too much what that worldview is, because I'm not comparing it with anything else while I'm reading. Afterward can be another story, depending on how much of a shock it is to come back to the 'real' world.

                At least half the future I've been expecting hasn't gotten here yet. Sigh.... (Yes, there's gender bias in my name; no, I wasn't thinking about it when I signed up. My apologies.)

                by serendipityisabitch on Wed Jun 26, 2013 at 08:56:28 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

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