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View Diary: Paula Deen - It's not the "n-word," it's much more dangerous. (249 comments)

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  •  Precisely (19+ / 0-)

    I loathe "Gone With the Wind." So much. So many white women grew up for generations on that movie, seeing it as the accurate representation of history.

    And, yeah, way too many Democrats subscribe to the idea that we're the good guy, which leads to a lot of silence on things which should matter.

    Time is of no account with great thoughts, which are as fresh to-day as when they first passed through their authors' minds ages ago. - Samuel Smiles

    by moviemeister76 on Fri Jun 28, 2013 at 08:37:55 AM PDT

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    •  Edmond Burke.... (6+ / 0-)

      'No man, who is not inflamed by vain-glory into enthusiasm, can flatter himself that his single, unsupported, desultory, unsystematic endeavours are of power to defeat the subtle designs and united Cabals of ambitious citizens. When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall, one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle."

      •  Heh (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Nulwee, kyril, politicalceci

        Burke actually believed that collectives actually presented good checks and balances, and so nothing gets left out. About what I'd expect from a white male of his time.

        Time is of no account with great thoughts, which are as fresh to-day as when they first passed through their authors' minds ages ago. - Samuel Smiles

        by moviemeister76 on Fri Jun 28, 2013 at 11:31:01 AM PDT

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    •  I loathe "Gone with the Wind," too. (18+ / 0-)

      From the moment I first saw it, when I was about 12, I loathed it. At the time I didn't realize just why, but it seemed like an insult to women. O'Hara was weak and pathetic, and I came from a long line of strong women. All my friends were oooh-ing and aaah-ing over it.

      I was in northern Arkansas and have returned to the hills to retire. Now that I realize I was surrounded why "Southerners" who more fit the mold, I understand why I didn't fit in. Both of my maternal grandparents were descended from abolitionists, and it was a source of family pride. Even though my knowledge of slavery was vague at that age, it was absolutely clear to me that it was wrong.

      Though I understand why people use the generalization of "Southerner," I still wish not to be included in that group to which I still do not belong. It's frustrating as all get out (especially since I paid dearly for being active in the civil rights movement in the late '60s).

      People still think of Scarlett O'Hara, though, when they hear my accent. (I learned that working in the racist city of St. Louis.) The tradition and the stereotype is disgusting, but it persists.

      "Let each unique song be sung and the spell of differentiation be broken" - Winter Rabbit

      by cotterperson on Fri Jun 28, 2013 at 10:41:54 AM PDT

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      •  OMG Thank you! (7+ / 0-)

        I have never, ever understood all the women who have swooned about how romantic the story was. O'Hara was pathetic, weak and irresponsible. As much as I don't like my mom, the one thing I absolutely cannot call her is weak. And that definitely influenced how I saw the film. She also loathes the book and movie.

        And there's a lot of issues with how we view people with certain accents. My husband is from Rhode Island, and after he left as an adult he deliberately worked real hard to get rid of it. Now, you can't tell where he comes from unless he gets angry. I've lived in North Carolina for 16 years, and I have met some amazingly brilliant men and women here with very strong drawls. That made me lose the prejudice I had against it real quick.

        Time is of no account with great thoughts, which are as fresh to-day as when they first passed through their authors' minds ages ago. - Samuel Smiles

        by moviemeister76 on Fri Jun 28, 2013 at 10:57:56 AM PDT

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