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View Diary: The Copernican Revolution and my Red Wigglers (61 comments)

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  •  I have bad news for you... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Limelite, karmsy, shaharazade

    Worms won't eat your avocado pits. Nor will they eat raw potatoes or any other thing that grows when it is buried under the soil. So, if seeds or viable cuttings wind up in your vermiposting bin, expect to find plant shoots growing out of the soil (pale sun starved plant shoots) when you open up your bin to feed the worms.

    The good news is that if you carefully lift these shoots out with their surrounding worm castings, you have a head start on growing whatever it is that sprouted. I have tomatoes and beans and a squash plant on the balcony that started that way.

    Makes sense if you think about it: if worms ate seeds, nothing would ever grow.

    One way to avoid the shredder is to roughly tear paper then soak it in water for a few days and massage it into paper mache. Let the paper mache dry in thin sheet then use it as you would cardboard.

    "The problems of incompetent, corrupt, corporatist government are incompetence, corruption and corporatism, not government." Jerome a Paris

    by Orinoco on Mon Jul 08, 2013 at 11:50:10 PM PDT

    •  Good tip, thanks. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Orinoco

      By and large, I want to compost stuff the worms will consume completely. I wouldn't have put the pit in if I had known, since I have virtually no space to grow stuff outdoors. I DID chop the pit up before putting it in, to make it easier for the worms to digest, I thought. Does that mean each fragment of the see will sprout a little plant?

      It's here they got the range/ and the machinery for change/ and it's here they got the spiritual thirst. --Leonard Cohen

      by karmsy on Tue Jul 09, 2013 at 06:37:25 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  No, each avocado seed only sprouts one plant (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        karmsy

        most of the pit is food for the growing avocado plant. Chopping the pit will make it easier for bacteria to attack the bits, and eventually degrade them to the point where they become worm food, and if you cut the embryo avocado plant while you were chopping, it won't sprout either.

        Leftover cooked potatoes compost quite well, so it may be that cooking avocado pits for a while will alter them so they become worm food. I haven't tried that, though.

        "The problems of incompetent, corrupt, corporatist government are incompetence, corruption and corporatism, not government." Jerome a Paris

        by Orinoco on Tue Jul 09, 2013 at 12:30:11 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  You know what my lil' buggers LOVE? (0+ / 0-)

          It's white bread. They go bananas. It's something with those simple carbs...

          It's here they got the range/ and the machinery for change/ and it's here they got the spiritual thirst. --Leonard Cohen

          by karmsy on Tue Jul 09, 2013 at 08:05:42 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I have so many recipies for stale bread (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            karmsy

            that bread of any sort never makes it into the worm bin. Even the stuff that gets super hard gets ground up for bread crumbs.

            What gets my little buggers going is coffee grounds and banana peels. Fortunately for them I love coffee. And bananas.

            "The problems of incompetent, corrupt, corporatist government are incompetence, corruption and corporatism, not government." Jerome a Paris

            by Orinoco on Wed Jul 10, 2013 at 05:18:55 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

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