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View Diary: Keeping on Keeping on (8 comments)

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  •  The five are fighting over a pie that... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    janraefrank

    ...some sneaky kid has stolen off the windowsill.

    Barnes & Noble isn't going to last much longer.

    The used bookstores have less and less stock to sell, as the numbers of books that are printed plummets, due to a lack of distribution outlets.

    The indie stores can't support themselves on new books alone.  And the publishers don't care about them enough to actually... you know... work - to nurture that market segment.

    The textbook market is wedded to the economies of scale that a successful publishing industry creates.  As dead-tree publishing dives, the price of textbooks will go through the roof (as if it hasn't already).

    And finally, e-readers suck:  for textbooks, absorbing fiction... just about anything.  There's plenty of people who like them - and like having the ePublishers go into their devices and remove what they've paid for whenever they feel like it - but really, if you can't stick your fingers between the pages in a spot?  Nah.

    ...speaking of curmudgeons.  Heh.

    It ain't called paranoia - when they're really out to get you. 6 points.

    by Jaime Frontero on Wed Jul 10, 2013 at 07:45:30 AM PDT

    •  great points (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Jaime Frontero

      I read more dead tree books, than ebooks. Although I have a good many at this point. I have to agree with you about the tactile quality of print.

      The big stores forced the majority of the Indie stores out of business, many of them places that had been around for over a century. The loss of the Victor Hugo Bookstore was a major source of sorrow for a lot of us.

      The thing I like most about my ereader is the way I can read books that have become too heavy for my damaged hand to curl up with.

      Everyone is going to hurt on the prices of textbooks. It was a very narrow margin of profit to begin with. They only give stores a 20% discount as opposed to the 35% to 55% discount on mass market.

      "Duty is where you find it." me Curmudgeon Blog

      by janraefrank on Wed Jul 10, 2013 at 08:06:59 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  There's quite a burgeoning market... (0+ / 0-)

        ...for pirated eBook textbooks now, too.

        And an open source e-textbook initiative that's looking fairly strong.

        What a conflict.  Environmentalism versus the feel of a well-made book...

        It ain't called paranoia - when they're really out to get you. 6 points.

        by Jaime Frontero on Wed Jul 10, 2013 at 08:11:06 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Most things are a group of interlocking (0+ / 0-)

          problems. If this country had not developed the practice of letting large swathes of the inner city die so that they could continue to build on virgin ground, we could create a sustainable source of paper.

          I'm all in favor of open source e-textbooks.

          I'm ambivalent about piracy. But I intend to discuss it. For the most part, I agree with Cory Doctorow about them.

          "Duty is where you find it." me Curmudgeon Blog

          by janraefrank on Wed Jul 10, 2013 at 08:17:24 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Read Rick Falkvinge much? (0+ / 0-)

            Yes - Doctorow pretty well sums it up in pointing out that to enforce copyright requires 24/7 surveillance.  You get one, you get the other.  He's (obviously) right.

            What was that you were saying about interlocking problems?

            It ain't called paranoia - when they're really out to get you. 6 points.

            by Jaime Frontero on Wed Jul 10, 2013 at 08:30:45 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Husbandry of the environment (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Jaime Frontero

              The life and survival of print books, as you pointed out, goes into conflict with basic environmentalism. And it does.

              The troubles brought about by allowing sections of our cities to die rather than rebuilding on already been used ground has complicated the production of paper for books. We have not taken care of the environment properly. If we had, then paper would not have become so costly.

              And the production of paper has resulted in things like clear cutting of huge swathes of forest in various southern states, most of which gets sent to China as wood chips.

              The section of Massachusetts that I live in was once filled with paper mills that employed many many people. They are all gone now.

              So one bad situation has led to another linked bad situation and it continues to build up. Like an environmental/social game of dominoes.

              "Duty is where you find it." me Curmudgeon Blog

              by janraefrank on Wed Jul 10, 2013 at 08:48:42 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

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