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View Diary: NSA Lawsuits Because Snowden, Whistleblower (246 comments)

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  •  asdf (1+ / 0-)
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    Words In Action

    1) ""Solitary confinement does one thing: It breaks a man's will to live and he ends up deteriorating. He's never the same person again... [it is] inhumane and by its design is driving men insane."

    Thousands of California prisoners are protesting solitary confinement with hunger strikes.

    2) Interestingly enough, it appears there isn't one; Bill Clinton vetoed a bill that would've made any sort of leaking of classified material illegal, saying it might "create an undue chilling effect" (oh, the irony). The espionage act was intended for people who aided enemies--not people whose actions may, perhaps, one day incidentally provide some nebulous benefit to "enemies." I don't really have a problem if ordinary leakers 'just' lose their job.

    3) Really? Do tell what the "very particular meaning" of a politically-motivated prosecution is; then tell me why it would be acceptable for the prosecuting country itself to decide whether or not they're being politically motivated.

    "He, O men, is the wisest, who, like Socrates, knows that his wisdom is in truth worth nothing."--Socrates

    by TealTerror on Fri Jul 19, 2013 at 12:28:15 AM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  The only thing I find interesting in your reply... (0+ / 0-)

      Tell me in the most general possible terms what a politically-motivated prosecution is not.

      •  You're missing the point. (0+ / 0-)

        If we let the prosecuting country decide whether or not its prosecution is politically-motivated, then there will quickly be no politically-motivated prosecutions. Ideally there'd be some sort of international court with the power to decide these things, but absent that, we only really have two choices:

        1) The prosecuting country decides if the prosecution is politically-motivated.
        2) The asylum country decides if the prosecution is politically-motivated.

        I prefer world #2.

        (P.S.: To answer your question--a politically-motivated prosecution is not one that's mainly motivated by the government's desire to increase its own power. Whether or not the Snowden case is politically-motivated is, IMO, up for debate.)

        "He, O men, is the wisest, who, like Socrates, knows that his wisdom is in truth worth nothing."--Socrates

        by TealTerror on Fri Jul 19, 2013 at 09:49:24 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  To which I have another question or two... (0+ / 0-)

          1) Does not the asylum country already decide whether something is politically motivated or not?

          After all, the USA follows its own prerogatives and the potential country of asylum follows its own.  Why should the USA allow let a fugitive keep his passport?  Why shouldn't the USA ask its allies not to grant asylum to a fugitive?

          It seems like you're asking the USA to LET the fugitive go, in the event some other country says "yes."  What country would EVER do such a thing?

          a politically-motivated prosecution is not one that's mainly motivated by the government's desire to increase its own power.
          That is not a workable standard by any means.  Depending on one's opinion, the passage of any law at all could be called a government attempt at self-aggrandizement.  

          That problem aside, in a situation where actual, non-controversial laws have been broken, it is easy to say the prosecution is not politically motivated.  (The program may be controversial but a statute barring the leaking of classified materials is not a controversial law).

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