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View Diary: Political Geography of Maine, Part 4: Down East Maine (27 comments)

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  •  If that's all it takes (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    salmo, Nautical Knots

    to sour you on a place, then you probably shouldn't visit anywhere that 1) is not urban, since most suburban and rural voters are generally not particularly supportive of gun control, and 2) voted less than 80 percent for Obama, since you'll probably see Republicans (horrors!) in those places.

    Also, there's more to visiting a place than the politics of the people there. Maine has an incredible amount of natural beauty, and if you have to pass a few SUVs with conservative bumper stickers in order to get there, then so be it. Acadia is extremely beautiful, and it's liberal too; MDI voted about 67 percent for Obama. I highly recommend going there; maybe it'll change your opinion of Maine.

    (-8.38, -4.72), CT-02 (home), ME-01 (college) "The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few, or the one." -Spock

    by ProudNewEnglander on Thu Jul 18, 2013 at 12:15:40 PM PDT

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    •  This was meant as a reply to leftangler's (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      salmo

      original post.

      (-8.38, -4.72), CT-02 (home), ME-01 (college) "The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few, or the one." -Spock

      by ProudNewEnglander on Thu Jul 18, 2013 at 12:24:22 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  It's sort of like playing a fish (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Nautical Knots, leftangler

      There is an art to priming some of our more contrary characters.  Like any good fireworks show, the fuse and the detonator are the most important part.  

    •  What about the hairy dude who chased me (0+ / 0-)

      around the parking lot at Wal Mart because I inadverdently cut him off? It's not one visit, I've been experiencing this for ten years! But yeah, I'm hankering to get at the fish again, hard to beat the fishing in Maine. At one time, believe it or not, the fishing in NJ was second to none. But my BIL and his neighbors can be such assholes. Most of em have money too. You should have seen all the LePaige signs in the neighborhood a few years back. The only one I like is his 91 year old uncle, a retired union man who is as lefty as you can get, crotchety and opinionated. He tells them allthey are full of shit, then goes home and turns on Free Speech TV. Dude begs me to call him over whenever I come up.

    •  Look, I already got lost once near the border (0+ / 0-)

      on a dirt road at 3 am and almost hit a fucking moose! Which really scared the shit outta me, Thought it was a sasquatch....

      •  That's really cool! (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Zack from the SFV

        I'd like to see a moose in Maine. The only moose I've ever seen was in New Hampshire.

        And living in the country, you just get used to sharing the outdoors with large animals. In Connecticut, it's deer. Many of my family members have had close calls (and some actual collisions) with deer here in CT. In Maine, it's moose. Personally, I think that deer and moose enhance the character of the New England outdoors.

        (-8.38, -4.72), CT-02 (home), ME-01 (college) "The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few, or the one." -Spock

        by ProudNewEnglander on Fri Jul 19, 2013 at 10:32:40 AM PDT

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        •  I live in the city, and I have lots of deer issues (0+ / 0-)

          and also groundhogs, raccoons that get in your attic and rip the tiles from the roof, smelly skunks and stray cats. Plus squirrels who wait for the tomatoes to just about get ripe, then pick them, eat half and leave the rest on the patio.....

          •  I guess that's the difference (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Zack from the SFV

            between people who live in the city and people who live in the country. City-dwellers view animals as annoying nuisances (which some, I'll admit, are), while rural people generally like seeing wild animals walking around outside the house (especially turkeys, I love those).

            One reason why this may be is that urban animals are more acclimated to the presence of humans and are thus more fearless and harder to scare off. Generally, if a squirrel gets into the bird feeder behind my house, five seconds of yelling at it will make it run away.

            (-8.38, -4.72), CT-02 (home), ME-01 (college) "The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few, or the one." -Spock

            by ProudNewEnglander on Fri Jul 19, 2013 at 11:43:55 AM PDT

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            •  Scared? The raccoons here do all the scaring! (0+ / 0-)

              And the groundhogs too....I suggest the book Nature Wars...more people live in close proximation to wild animals in the US than ever before. Your houseis just moreof the forest to them. I don't shoot my wildlife ( I've no problem with hunters ) by my BIL and his pals in Maine shoot red squirrels on site, because they are "a nuisance" It is illegal in my town to discharge a firearm,

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