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View Diary: Who Among Us Honestly Believes the Zimmerman Prosecution Tried to Win? (192 comments)

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  •  Floys - one nit (15+ / 0-)

    It was not the Sandord States Attorney's office who tried the case. As you recall special counsel was assigned by the State of Florida because the local States Attorney would not file because he did not believe the evidence supported a criminal indictment for manslaughter. Angela Corey, a high profile States Attorney from another district, was assigned to prosecute this case.

    I believe that Angela Corey tried to convict George Zimmerman. I think the prosecution made many mistakes in how they charged and prosecuted the case, but I believe they wanted to convict him. No prosecutor wants to be on national TV and lose.

    "let's talk about that"

    by VClib on Fri Jul 19, 2013 at 06:52:19 AM PDT

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    •  that's an excellent point...and more than a nit... (7+ / 0-)

      however, IMHO, after seeing the presser Corey had after she brought charges, I didn't think she was gonna go all out to win, and I said it then.  Hers is also a politically-influenced position.
      (Much as the AG in Pennsy is going after Gov Corbett like a bulldog. Sure I am cheering her on,and Corbett deserves it, but it IS political!)

      Ayn is the bane! Take the Antidote To Ayn Rand and call your doctor in the morning: You have health insurance now! @floydbluealdus1

      by Floyd Blue on Fri Jul 19, 2013 at 07:00:15 AM PDT

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    •  My knee jerks fast and hard. Sometimes (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      VClib, white blitz

      my knee doesn't read all the fine print.  I guess that's why I am a blogger and a novel writer, and not a journalist back in 1950 (note how I do not give today's journalists any more credence than bloggers).

      Ayn is the bane! Take the Antidote To Ayn Rand and call your doctor in the morning: You have health insurance now! @floydbluealdus1

      by Floyd Blue on Fri Jul 19, 2013 at 07:05:56 AM PDT

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    •  I think that many career prosecutors are not up (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Neuroptimalian

      to trying a case like this one with so much media attention.  Prosecutors enjoy a special relationship with Judges and law enforcement that makes it easy for them to slide by without the kind of planning that defense lawyers usually need to do.  When the scrutiny is greater than usual they can't rely on those relationships to cut corners and it shows.

      "Speak the TRUTH, even if your voice shakes."

      by stellaluna on Fri Jul 19, 2013 at 09:27:58 AM PDT

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      •  What's that based on? (0+ / 0-)

        Some of the best trial lawyers I've met were prosecutors.  And in many counties, DAs and public defenders are often friendly with either other and with the judges - they all see each other every day - but ultimately, it's the jurors who are the deciders, assuming it gets to trial.

        Every place has its slackers, but unless you have some special insight at prosecutor offices nationwide, I don't think it's fair to paint with such a broad brush.

      •  Based on what evidence? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Dr Swig Mcjigger

        Could you please state your reasons for this conclusion, because it definitely does not coincide with my experience as a prosecutor.

        A criminal defense guilty verdict can be appealed by the defendant, a verdict of acquittal cannot be appealed by the prosecution. Judges hate being appealed (again, based on my experience in my district), and often give the defense leeway that is not extended to the prosecution.

        The toughest judges I have known have been former prosecutors.

        _Let's dedicate ourselves to what the Greeks wrote so many years ago: to tame the savageness of man and make gentle the life of this world. Let us dedicate ourselves to that, and say a prayer for our country and for our people. Robert Kennedy_

        by bogieshadow on Fri Jul 19, 2013 at 10:43:41 AM PDT

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        •  It's not just in the hands of the Judges either. (0+ / 0-)

          Almost all forcible felony trials are to a jury, and any prejudice a judge might have is very curtailed, if not negated, by the jury's verdict.

          Only in a bench trial does a judge make the determination of guilt or acquittal, and the defendant gets to decide whether to take his or her case to a jury or just the judge - the prosecution has no say in the matter.

          _Let's dedicate ourselves to what the Greeks wrote so many years ago: to tame the savageness of man and make gentle the life of this world. Let us dedicate ourselves to that, and say a prayer for our country and for our people. Robert Kennedy_

          by bogieshadow on Fri Jul 19, 2013 at 10:46:52 AM PDT

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      •  This is based on my experience as a criminal (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        denise b

        defense attorney.  But also based on watching trials across the country like this one.  Admittedly this is entirely based on my opinion from what I have observed.  First and foremost the prosecutor has the entire power of the State behind them in all cases.  Need a witness? Ask the cops to go find him.  Have a reluctant witness? Offer him a deal.  Need an exparte Order signed?  Ask the judge one floor up to sign it.  I have seen judges argue the law with defense attorneys frequently while the prosecution just has to stand there.  Because you are correct..

        The toughest judges I have known have been former prosecutors.
        Judges may dislike appeals but in many states they can count on the appellate courts to back them up no matter how tortured their logic.  I am not saying all prosecutors aren't good attorneys.  But I am saying that representing the state gives them status that makes things easier for them when it comes to trying a case.  An ease that can make up for failures to prepare or think through their case.  And so I think it shows when there is a trial with nationwide attention.

        I think the prosecutors in this case made terrible errors.  Most of those were tactical errors and errors that allowed the defense to set the narrative of the case.  I think that happened because they weren't as good of trial attorneys as the defense.  I don' think they deliberately threw the trial because they wanted to lose.  I agree with those who said their own personal and professional pride should prevent that.  I just don't think they were very good.  And I think career prosecutors end up over all not being as good for various reasons.

        "Speak the TRUTH, even if your voice shakes."

        by stellaluna on Sat Jul 20, 2013 at 06:42:12 AM PDT

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    •  Why did they wait until half way through the (0+ / 0-)

      trial to add in the lesser charge?

      "They did not succeed in taking away our voice" - Angelique Kidjo - Opening the Lightning In a Bottle concert at Radio City Music Hall in New York City - 2003

      by LilithGardener on Fri Jul 19, 2013 at 09:36:07 AM PDT

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      •  Because they stupidly thought they had a ... (3+ / 0-)

        Murder 2 case from the beginning.  When they realized the evidence didn't support that (especially when their own witnesses didn't say what they thought would be said, and/or the defense's cross exams were able to pull statements from them that were favorable to the defense), as reinforced by most all of the media pundits weighing in with negative opinions, they got desperate ... so desperate, they even tried to add the "child abuse" charge at the last minute.  The prosecution is being roundly laughed at now by their colleagues across the country, something they well deserve.

        "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity, and I am not sure about the universe." -- Albert Einstein

        by Neuroptimalian on Fri Jul 19, 2013 at 01:26:24 PM PDT

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        •  I agree they bungled it (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Neuroptimalian, Dr Swig Mcjigger

          and that whole business of referring to Trayvon as a child was stupid too. He was not a child, he was not a black male, he was a young man, or a young man who was African American.

          I read through a number cases in the SYG database at the Tampa Bay Times and have a better understanding now of how they apply the law, and what elements the rely on to grant immunity. It's kind of stunning how often they are acquitted even if they go to trial.

          "They did not succeed in taking away our voice" - Angelique Kidjo - Opening the Lightning In a Bottle concert at Radio City Music Hall in New York City - 2003

          by LilithGardener on Fri Jul 19, 2013 at 01:36:22 PM PDT

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