Skip to main content

View Diary: As Fundies Die Off, the Religious Left Grows (139 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  demographics. People like patterns. Good for (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    TomP, Dallasdoc

    statisticians and pundits.

    It's also something to talk about.

    •  Only good for Republicans, actually. (9+ / 0-)

      BBC documentarian Adam Curtis ("Power of Nightmares") wrote an excellent blog about it last year. A snip:

      In the early 1970s in Washington a small group of young conservative activists came together to try and change American politics. They called themselves the New Right and they were convinced that unless they did something drastic, the liberals and the left-wingers in America were going to take over the country.

      One of the leaders of the New Right was a man called Paul Weyrich, and in the wake of the student revolts of 1968 he infiltrated the meetings of left-wing grassroots organisations. He was astonished by the amount of planning and tactics that he saw and he realised that the conservative movement in America was completely unaware of all this. The right, he said, were still trapped by the belief that people would simply vote for them because they were right.

      So the New Right set out to organise a new grassroots movement that could counter the left's success. They had all sorts of discussions and during one of them Weyrich pointed out that there were millions of Americans who were socially and culturally very conservative but who never voted. They were the religious fundamentalists and the evangelicals - a vast segment of the population who believed that they should never get involved in politics.

      [So they went to see Jerry Falwell in 1979. More below.]

      http://www.bbc.co.uk/...

      The Christian right has been a notable force in both the Republican party and American politics since the late 1970s, when Baptist pastor Jerry Falwell and other Christian leaders began to urge conservative Christians to involve themselves in the political process. In response to the rise of the Christian right, the 1980 Republican Party platform assumed a number of its positions, including dropping support for the Equal Rights Amendment and adding support for a restoration of school prayer; abortion was also opposed.[4][5] Since about 1980, the Christian right has been associated with several institutions including the Moral Majority, the Christian Coalition, Focus on the Family and the Family Research Council.[12][13]

      https://en.wikipedia.org/...

      "Let each unique song be sung and the spell of differentiation be broken" - Winter Rabbit

      by cotterperson on Fri Jul 19, 2013 at 11:48:46 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site