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View Diary: Maryland Unveils Obamacare Prices - Among Lowest in the U.S. (119 comments)

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  •  The hospitals don't get less per patient, they (9+ / 0-)

    get more patients who pay. Even a small number of patients can have a big impact on costs. One hospitalization that goes unpaid can be many many thousands of dollars.
    New York has had some insurance backup for low income folks all along, so it may be that the increased number of insured is not huge. However, in some other states, the insurance pool might make a really big difference.

    While Democrats work to get more people to vote, Republicans work to ensure those votes won't count.

    by Tamar on Fri Jul 26, 2013 at 02:59:56 PM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  Yes, hundreds of thousands in fact (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Lujane
      One hospitalization that goes unpaid can be many many thousands of dollars
      However, my understanding is that this pulls in "healthy" people who are unlikely to very often even use health care services.

      So on one hand, that would seem like a bonanza (because they're paying in, but not actually using the services)

      But OTOH the way that health care reimbursement works in this country (i.e., reimbursement is on a fee for service basis) if they are not using any services, places like the Johns Hopkins Hospital are not going to be pulling in any extra revenue.

      •  why would you think "this pulls in 'healthy' (6+ / 0-)

        people?" My guess, from my public health background, is just the opposite. The uninsured people most likely to quickly sign up for health insurance, once it becomes available, are those who know they have health problems and are worried about getting care. My bet is that a significant percentage of people who sign up for individual coverage are people who have serious health concerns.

        While Democrats work to get more people to vote, Republicans work to ensure those votes won't count.

        by Tamar on Fri Jul 26, 2013 at 03:23:25 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  A point to consider (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Lujane
        However, my understanding is that this pulls in "healthy" people who are unlikely to very often even use health care services.
        My wife once worked in medical billing and saw a case where a young man who suffered a severe brain injury in a car accident ran up hundreds of thousands of dollars in care in a fairly brief time.  Over his lifetime, his treatment might run into the millions.

        This is a young man in his early 20's who was in perfectly good health but then suffered an unforeseen accident.

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