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View Diary: Why the San Francisco Bay Area Deserves Better Public Transit (142 comments)

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  •  What about more capacity for bicycles? (6+ / 0-)

    You mentioned Caltrains being overcrowded- it's much worse if you are trying to bring your bicycle along. They need to have more dedicated bike cars.  Same with BART- they need to allow bicycles at all hours and all stations.

    •  BART recently revised its bike rules (12+ / 0-)

      Bikes are allowed at all stations at all times, excepting the first three cars of any train. Not only does Caltrain need more dedicated bike cars, it needs to dispense with the commuter rail design and, with its new train buy, purchase cars with more standing room.

      •  That is great news. I haven't ridden BART (5+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        blueoregon, Edmund Xu, koNko, Radiowalla, sfbob

        in a while. But since I live in Milpitas, I'm eagerly awaiting the arrival of BART!

      •  unfortunately (7+ / 0-)

        it's only a 6-month trial period, but the hope is that BART makes it permanent after this trial. There's just no excuse not to let bikes on BART at all times. I'm also hoping that those brand-spanking new cars they ordered will be designed with bikes in mind.

        Ecology is the new Economy => Kosonomy

        by citisven on Tue Aug 13, 2013 at 09:29:17 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Um, dispense with commuter rail design? (0+ / 0-)

        It's a pretty classic commuter rail system.  Busy, yes, but commuter rail is still commuter rail.

        "The first drawback of anger is that it destroys your inner peace; the second is that it distorts your view of reality. If you come to understand that anger is really unhelpful, you can begin to distance yourself from anger." - The Dalai Lama

        by auron renouille on Tue Aug 13, 2013 at 10:03:55 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  A little too busy for my liking, (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Nulwee

          Any commuter rail train that is standing-room during off-peak hours needs more standing room space and less chairs, imo.

          •  What it may need is longer trainsets or more (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Oh Mary Oh, Nulwee

            efficiently-used space.  There's more than one way to skin that cat.  Assuming that Caltrain benefits from the CAHSR grade separations, Caltrain will be fully grade-separated and will be able to run longer trains, as well as being able to more flexibly respond to demand.  Also, when I've been on those trains, it seems like space is poorly utilized.  High-level platforms, which is another potential benefit of CAHSR, may remove one level but will also remove the stairwells and will make boarding much faster.

            At the end of the day, it's still commuter rail.  Trying to turn it into an urban rail system a la BART will fail - it has high ridership, yes, but not high enough for that kind of service.   NJT/CCR and MTA successfully run commuter rail systems with quite high ridership too, and while San José has been developing as a job center, commuting patterns in the city still call for service to focus on SF commuters (with some focus necessary for SJ-bound services as well, of course).

            "The first drawback of anger is that it destroys your inner peace; the second is that it distorts your view of reality. If you come to understand that anger is really unhelpful, you can begin to distance yourself from anger." - The Dalai Lama

            by auron renouille on Tue Aug 13, 2013 at 10:19:19 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  What I'm thinking of is a more efficient design, (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Nulwee, sfbob

              something like this: http://newcastleonhunter.com/...

              Electrification will bring faster stop and go speeds, and hopefully more frequent headways. That will hopefully be coming soon, and is much-needed.

              While I agree that changing Caltrain to an metro system like BART will fail, I disagree on the reason why. Such a project will be massively expensive and will be fought tooth and nail by the NIMBYs on the peninsula. I do believe corridor has enough density to justify an urban metro, though. It is similar to the East Bay in that regard.

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