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  •  What if the community lives by a rule and ... (1+ / 0-)
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    ZhenRen

    ... an individual within it doesn't? Assuming it's an important rule, does the community accept the individual even when that individual doesn't accept the rule?

    2014 IS COMING. Build up the Senate. Win back the House : 17 seats. Plus!

    by TRPChicago on Sun Jul 28, 2013 at 06:01:57 AM PDT

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    •  There won't be 100% agreement (1+ / 0-)
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      ukit

      in anarchist society on everything.

      I think that goes without saying. Commonsense applies.

      But when each person is given a voice in how their community will function, people tend to be far more respectful of decisions made, since they have a personal voice in everything that is done. So they tend to be more accepting of agreements, since they know how hard people would work at coming up with solutions which serve the community well. When each person is treated equally, there is far more incentive to accept solutions.

      People who are completely opposed to non-authoritarian systems would have the option of going to another community. These would be people who want to impose authority (usually in the form of private ownership of the means of production) and such persons would not be "free" to impose authority over others, thus depriving people of their own rights to freedom. One persons "freedom" ends at the point in which it unjustly enslaves another.

      As to crime, see my post upthread.

      "In times of universal deceit, telling the truth will be a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

      by ZhenRen on Sun Jul 28, 2013 at 10:24:39 AM PDT

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      •  Thanks! Intellectually, I understand, but ... (1+ / 0-)
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        ZhenRen

        ... practically, there may not be another community available. Or the non-folllower doesn't want to leave. What then?

        It's not hypothetical. In the closest situation I can relate to ... My social-worker daughter - who is excellent at defusing unconventional behavior and channeling it if appropriate - works in and for a loosely governed organization with an incredibly broad and open-ended personal values orientation. It's not anarchy, of course, but it is about as rule-free and self-effectuating as any organization in a reality-based urban environment can be.

        It is sometimes held hostage by individuals (even by employees!) who do not want to abide by this particular community-based rule or that one, but who do not want to leave the community. (Understandably, because none of the readily available alternatives are as good.)

        What I'm trying to focus on is that people may want the advantages of a non-authoritarian community and are willing to accept many "rules" for the common good, but not every rule, no matter how reasonable it is and how socialized its formulation was among community members. They're not opposed to non-authoritarian systems at all; they embrace them. They just want to blink away that rule, or this one that their personal judgment finds too confining or unreasonable applied to them.

        At some point, the strength of the community is lessened by the aberrant individual.

        2014 IS COMING. Build up the Senate. Win back the House : 17 seats. Plus!

        by TRPChicago on Sun Jul 28, 2013 at 11:29:34 AM PDT

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        •  I understand (1+ / 0-)
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          TRPChicago

          And no doubt there will always be individuals like those you describe.

          No one said anarchism would eliminate all sources of stress and bad behavior. But anarchist society would tend to create more cooperation, as the fading away of the competitiveness of capitalism, and the mutual adversity of capitalism, would engender a much more egalitarian society.

          But perfection isn't the goal. Anarchism is just a better way to socially organize. It isn't being sold as utopian.

          Rebellion against rules often comes from people who grow up feeling disenfranchised. When they are brought into the decision making process of making the workplace, or community, function, using workplace assemblies and direct democracy, they often will feel as if they've been heard, and they become more cooperative since they feel more equal, even if they don't get their way. And everyone would be enjoying the same, equal treatment, and feel part of the community effort, rather than as lone wolves alienated by the system. Over time, the social environment would feel much different.

          But to achieve this, the entire community would have to be organized this way.

          But people who consistently act out toward others would have to be dealt with, and to answer that I refer you to my comment upthread about crime.

          "In times of universal deceit, telling the truth will be a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

          by ZhenRen on Sun Jul 28, 2013 at 12:06:30 PM PDT

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