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View Diary: Unusual German Surname? Got your German pedigree? How to check SS files to extend that pedigree... (87 comments)

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  •  Meine Familie kommt nach Fulda. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Zwenkau, Jay C, dewtx

    At least, from near Fulda. That's the paternal (name) line at least, and my GGG-Gf arrived in 1855, going to Cumberland, MD first for a few years. His offspring eventually made it to the West Coast, where I grew up.

    Some of the others were Mennonites from the Rhineland, a Luxemburgerin, and on my mother's side, Kashubian German speakers  from Pomerania. Oh, and some Irish/Scots/Welsh thrown in for good measure.

    My parents did the DNA test a few years ago, and they turned out to have identical haploid types. They were entirely Central European, and the Celtic heritage from my dad's mother was fully within those haploid groups, no outliers seen.

    And yeah, I know tarantulas don't really act like that at all, so no snarking, this is the internet damnit!

    by itzadryheat on Mon Aug 05, 2013 at 06:15:17 AM PDT

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    •  Sorry (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Zwenkau, dewtx, Mike Kahlow

      Ihre Familie kommt AUS Fulda.

      "Nach" in this context means "to", in the sense of "towards". Ich fahre nach Deutschland; I'm going to German. Ich komme aus Amerika; I come from America.

      Knew what you meant, should have left it alone, but couldn't.

      The Bush Family: 0 for 4 in Wisconsin

      by Korkenzieher on Mon Aug 05, 2013 at 09:46:24 AM PDT

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      •  Vielen danke, Korkenzieher! (0+ / 0-)

        My German grammar was a very long time ago, roughly 40 years or so.

        Any and all corrections gladly accepted!

        And yeah, I know tarantulas don't really act like that at all, so no snarking, this is the internet damnit!

        by itzadryheat on Mon Aug 05, 2013 at 08:03:17 PM PDT

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    •  DNA (0+ / 0-)

      There's a 2012 book out that I just purchased last night:  "DNA USA."  By the author of "Saxons, Vikings, and Celts," "Adam's Curse," and "The Seven Daughters of Eve."  You can read further about "Saxons, Vikings, and Celts," which was first published as "Blood of the Isles," on the Wikipedia page about the author, Bryan Sykes.  On that same Wikipedia page are links to the other two previous works I cite above.

      "There is no way to give to honest toil its just reward--its full share of all wealth produced--but by the full application of the single tax. And righteousness and justice require it to be done." --A. Moll, 1897

      by Zwenkau on Mon Aug 05, 2013 at 10:50:16 AM PDT

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    •  lol. Well, if they came from Fulda (0+ / 0-)

      they are least  most likely didn't start there as Mennonites.  That place is about as Catholic as it gets in Germany :-)

      Prew-war it used to be nearly 100% (save for a small Jewish community, and the occasional immigrated Protestant)

      •  Oh yeah, we were RC to the core. (0+ / 0-)

        That is from the paternal side; it was on my mom's side that those Rhenish Mennonites came from. Before that, they were actually some of those apostate Anabaptists, immigrating from a village near Zurich down river.

        We were a bit split growing up: nominally RC (Irish-American grandmother with a bit of an iron fist, doncha know), but our mother was a rather unconvinced Presbyterian. Our dad wasn't all that convinced as a Catholic either, so needless to say any sort of religious devotion fell apart in the early '70s. You know, godless heathens and all that dirty effing hippie stuff.

        And my extant German cousins? Very RC still, 160 years after our mutual relative immigrated to the US.

        And yeah, I know tarantulas don't really act like that at all, so no snarking, this is the internet damnit!

        by itzadryheat on Mon Aug 05, 2013 at 08:17:26 PM PDT

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