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View Diary: The big cover up: How the DEA uses domestic spying to poison justice (82 comments)

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  •  Not exactly. (3+ / 0-)

    Here your right to privacy has been violated and the government knows your guilty.  They find a pretext for an investigation and lo and behold the investigation turns up evidence of guilt.

    You are then prosecuted but are never told about the privacy breach that prompted the investigation.  The persecution proceeds on the pretext.

    Orwellian justice.

    Deserves it! I daresay he does. Many that live deserve death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgement. For even the very wise cannot see all ends. - Gandalf the Grey

    by No Exit on Mon Aug 05, 2013 at 10:53:09 AM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  I'm sure that's possible (0+ / 0-)

      but that's not what the linked article says is happening.

      As a practical matter, law enforcement agents said they usually don't worry that SOD's involvement will be exposed in court. That's because most drug-trafficking defendants plead guilty before trial and therefore never request to see the evidence against them. If cases did go to trial, current and former agents said, charges were sometimes dropped to avoid the risk of exposing SOD involvement.
      •   I don't know this sounds pretty similar... (0+ / 0-)

        A former federal agent in the northeastern United States who received such tips from SOD described the process. "You'd be told only, ‘Be at a certain truck stop at a certain time and look for a certain vehicle.' And so we'd alert the state police to find an excuse to stop that vehicle, and then have a drug dog search it," the agent said.

        "PARALLEL CONSTRUCTION"

        After an arrest was made, agents then pretended that their investigation began with the traffic stop, not with the SOD tip, the former agent said. The training document reviewed by Reuters refers to this process as "parallel construction."

        The two senior DEA officials, who spoke on behalf of the agency but only on condition of anonymity, said the process is kept secret to protect sources and investigative methods. "Parallel construction is a law enforcement technique we use every day," one official said. "It's decades old, a bedrock concept."

        Deserves it! I daresay he does. Many that live deserve death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgement. For even the very wise cannot see all ends. - Gandalf the Grey

        by No Exit on Mon Aug 05, 2013 at 12:26:55 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I think it has something to do with (0+ / 0-)

          illegal search and seizure.

          --and the invalidation of evidence obtained using those methods.

          •  Except that if you read the article closely (0+ / 0-)

            it suggests these searches are, for the most part, legal. The tip comes from legal NSA snooping on non American subjects (although that's sometimes not clear), or wiretaps authorized by warrants.

            The reason the NSA doesn't want their involvement coming into the light of day has more to do with trying to keep their sources and methods secret so that there is no tip off to bigger fish.

            •  for the most part? (0+ / 0-)

              there has to be a reasonable suspicion of a crime based on evidence obtained legally to perform a search.

              •  I'm referring to the NSA spying (0+ / 0-)

                on foreigners. Sometimes the nationality of a particular participant on a communication can be difficult to establish. They do make mistakes sometimes.

                Read the linked article. It's explained in there.

                Sometimes conventional domestic searches also do go awry. Cops execute a search warrant on the wrong address, for example.

        •  My point was that these cases don't go to trial (0+ / 0-)

          The defendant pleads out.

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