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View Diary: Elon Musk Unveils Hyperloop Ultra-Rapid-Transit Conceptual Work (247 comments)

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  •  Sorry, No (0+ / 0-)

    NASA is not at this point "buying rides" on CCiCap. NASA is paying for the SpaceX development in parallel with efforts from Boeing and SNC.

    "A famous person once said, 'You can fool some of the people some of the time, but you can't fool all of the people all of the time.' But as I once said, "If you don't teach them to read, you can fool them whenever you like." – Max Headroom

    by midnight lurker on Tue Aug 13, 2013 at 07:33:32 PM PDT

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    •  SpaceX has a contract with NASA (0+ / 0-)

      to fly 16 ISS resupply missions.  Thats known as buying rides.  The fact that Boeing and Sierra Nevada also have NASA contracts is irrelevant.  SpaceX has both government and private contracts, a successful launch history, and is by any measure a big success.

      While NASA's own rocket program was an engineering disaster.

      Já þýðir já. Nei þýðir nei. Hvað er svona erfitt við það?

      by Rei on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 04:03:56 AM PDT

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      •  Where Did the Development Funding Come From? (0+ / 0-)
        While SpaceX's previous launcher, the Falcon-1, was developed exclusively using private funding, the development of the Falcon-9 was significantly accelerated by the purchase of several demonstration flights by NASA. This started with seed money from the Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) program in 2006.
        --Wikipedia
        In other words,
        SpaceX contracted with the US government for a portion of the development funding for the Falcon 9 launch vehicle ...
        --Wikipedia
        Time will tell how well the Falcon launch vehicle series pans out. There are quite a few "rides" scheduled, but there have been only five launches so far, two of which were demo flights funded by COTS.

        Further downstream, man-rating a launch vehicle is a significant challenge.  Government is really the only customer, and I'm pretty sure they're not going to back down on the qualification standards. Look for more NASA development money to flow into SpaceX for that purpose.

        This is off-topic from the hyperloop project, which I personally think is just an embellished brainstorm, getting publicity only because of Musk's aura.

        And just to wrap things up, if an aircraft touched down at 120 kts and could apply a 1g average deceleration, it would stop in 636 feet. If it could accelerate at an average of 1g, it would take 6.2 seconds to reach a rotation speed of 120 kts.

        "A famous person once said, 'You can fool some of the people some of the time, but you can't fool all of the people all of the time.' But as I once said, "If you don't teach them to read, you can fool them whenever you like." – Max Headroom

        by midnight lurker on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 06:59:47 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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