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View Diary: Is Einstein's Special Relativity Theory Starting to Crumble? (102 comments)

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  •  Quantum entanglement doesn't transmit information (10+ / 0-)

    The PBS article itself says for an entangled pair, the best that can happen is that the particle randomly chooses one state, and the entangled distant particle then instantly assumes the same state.  Okay, fine, but that doesn't transmit any information.

    Say a scientist on Mars waits for the pre-arranged time, looks at his particle and sees State 1.

    What does state 1 mean?  What does state 2 mean?  That information would have to be sent ahead of time, with the particle, traveling at sub-light speed.

    Quantum entanglement doesn't allow any information to be sent to Mars faster than light speed.  Thus the laws of physics stand.

    Sorry, I want a sub-space radio also, but quantum entanglement isn't it.

    •  You state (0+ / 0-)

      Okay, fine, but that doesn't transmit any information.

      You lost me a bit.   The first sentence in the second article points to the fact that "For the first time, physicists have succeeded in teleporting information from one place to another in a solid state system".

      When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

      by Cat4everrr on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:13:49 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  BTW (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        LordMike

        I'd like a sub-space radio also [flashing my winning smile]

        When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

        by Cat4everrr on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:15:43 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  The article also states the following: (6+ / 0-)
        "Quantum teleportation is comparable to beaming as shown in the science fiction series Star Trek," says Wallraff. "The information does not travel from point A to point B. Instead, it appears at point B and disappears at point A, when read out at point B."
        This stuff is totally fascinating but way way beyond my reptile brain.  Einstein was well aware of "spooky action at a distance".  Everything I've read which did not make eyes glaze over doesn't speak to this as a crumbling of Einstein's theories.  

        I wouldn't be surprised though if in 500 years everything we know about quantum physics is all wrong or we still don't even begin to understand it.  Go back and look at what the great minds had for theories in science and we laugh.  In 500 years they might laugh at us.  

        Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.

        by thestructureguy on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:54:37 PM PDT

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      •  The quantum non-demolition experiments that (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Cat4everrr, barleystraw

        were a constitutent of Haroche's Nobel prize work, might (I am not sure) be thought of as teleportation, inasmuch as an entangled photon exits a resonant cavity, carrying with it information concerning the state of the cavity, which is read out by detecting (and destroying) the state of the photon, but without destroying the remote cavity state.  

        Nothing here (nor in quantum entanglement generally) to disturb special relativity.  The only recent (non)  event in that category was the (now debunked) report of a faster-than-light neutrino.  This had nothing to do with entanglement or teleportation.  One reason I thought it bogus from the start was that the excess speed was quite tiny, which suggested some sort of systematic error, rather than new physics.

        I am not a physicist by training, but I publish my work in physics journals (Physical Review, Journal of Chemical Physics).

        The hungry judges soon the sentence sign, And wretches hang, that jurymen may dine.

        by magnetics on Sun Aug 18, 2013 at 12:12:36 AM PDT

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        •  A real is a treat (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          barleystraw, magnetics

          and an honor to have youand a few others post on this thread.  Quantum Physics is a hobby of mine.  Do you hold out any hope for tachyons being discovered OR is it possible that tachyons and the higgs boson particle are the same?

          When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

          by Cat4everrr on Sun Aug 18, 2013 at 04:27:26 AM PDT

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    •  Bell's Telephone. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Cat4everrr

      It's an idea that's been around since Einstein's time, with a lot of thought experiments and attempts to explain it in different ways.

      Here's a paper I found at SETI explaining it.

      http://www.seti.org.au/...

      Nobody is trying to break the laws of physics.

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