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View Diary: You may want your Employer to Drop Subsidizing your Insurance (76 comments)

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  •  Considering how ACA subsidies are provided for (0+ / 0-)

    households with incomes less than $94,000/yr,  this problem should be extremely common for families where employers do not provide a subsidy for family members except in states where health insurance is inexpensive - as the out of pocket cost difference would be less in absolute dollars.

    Fundamentally, the problem occurs because the employer only subsidized the employee with no subsidy for the family members.  The government subsidies however apply to the employee and all family members.  So if the employer provides an employee subsidy, the employee's insurance qualifies for being "affordable" and the family members becomes ineligible for government subsidies.

    The most important way to protect the environment is not to have more than one child.

    by nextstep on Tue Aug 20, 2013 at 01:42:57 PM PDT

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    •  That's the problem with opposing a bill (0+ / 0-)

      because of hypothetical cases.  Who knows if such impacts will be felt.  In the meantime, where the exchanges have already opened, no such REAL cases have come to the forefront. Hypothetical cases don't sway me against ACA.  And so far, the scare tactics from the right have been nothing but hypothetical.  Give me something real to oppose it on, and I may change my mind.  But a case where a family might get $1500 a year extra in their pocket doesn't do it.

      If employers stop offering subsidized insurance to their employees because it behooves them to do so, I'm all for it.   Healthcare should have never been tied to employment to begin with.  

      If 30 million gain access to healthcare, it's a good bill to me. The goal for me is Universal healthcare for all, ACA is just a stepping stone we need to get there.  

      We are all in this together.

      by htowngenie on Tue Aug 20, 2013 at 02:00:54 PM PDT

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      •  It's likely real for my family. (6+ / 0-)

        The affordability ceiling of 9.5% applying only to the employee's policy premium is really a bad move.

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        by peregrine kate on Tue Aug 20, 2013 at 02:07:13 PM PDT

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        •  Wasn't this something that (0+ / 0-)

          was decided in court but wasn't the original intent of the ACA?(or maybe I'm confusing some other provision)

          "George RR Martin is not your bitch" ~~ Neil Gaiman

          by tardis10 on Tue Aug 20, 2013 at 02:22:43 PM PDT

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        •  I agree, it's not good, and you need to contact (0+ / 0-)

          your Congressperson about it if you are negatively impacted.  I have no doubt this may affect some people, but not NEGATIVELY.  They will still have employer based insurance.  Nothing changes for them.  So how will you be harmed?

          If you haven't visited your state exchange website yet, or you are not able to do the math yourself, try the Kaiser Family Foundation's calculator.  

          You might be surprised and end up saving $1500 a year like the family Mr. Wu imagines.  

          We are all in this together.

          by htowngenie on Tue Aug 20, 2013 at 02:52:19 PM PDT

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          •  When we are paying $1100 per month (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            tardis10, nextstep

            out of pocket for health insurance premiums (1 working person, 1 minor child, and 1 person on disability now receiving Medicare) then not being eligible for potentially cheaper and perhaps better coverage via an exchange is a negative consequence. $1500/year is not a negligible amount of money, especially given the medical bills we have.
            Yes, I've looked at the Kaiser site FWIW. The exchange info is not yet available for my state. How dare you be so condescending as to imply I have no idea what I'm talking about.

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            by peregrine kate on Tue Aug 20, 2013 at 03:35:35 PM PDT

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            •  I'm not condescending. (0+ / 0-)

              Don't want to pry, but how will you be harmed by ACA?  Maybe I can alleviate some of your fears since the anti-ACA crowd has been spreading scare stories that are false like the one in this diary.  I'm looking for a REAL case to convince me and welcome your input into the discussion.

              We are all in this together.

              by htowngenie on Tue Aug 20, 2013 at 04:07:57 PM PDT

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              •  I'm not harmed in that it won't be worse. (3+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                nextstep, tardis10, kareylou

                But I'm not going to be helped.
                Is it necessary for one's position to be worse to be disappointed by the shortcomings in the ACA? Surely you would not say that to someone who will not be covered by the ACA due to the Medicaid fiasco. They're no worse off than they were, having had no insurance before. But you're wrong if you think this is not a harm.
                Am I an opponent of the ACA? No. It has been helpful already to many and may eventually help more. But as has been so often lamented, it is not as good as what we need, and it is not as good as we had been led to believe.
                And by the way, simply asserting you're not being condescending doesn't make it so.

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                by peregrine kate on Tue Aug 20, 2013 at 04:17:41 PM PDT

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                •  Sorry if I offended you. (0+ / 0-)

                  I've re-read my comment.  Was it the math part that upset you?  I can see how that would offend someone. And I apologize, it wasn't necessary.  

                  I, too, am disappointed in the ACA but believe it will be the only means to move us forward to single payer.  

                  I am not sure I understand your comment about the medicaid fiasco, but I assume you are referring to states that did not accept expanded Medicaid.  I live in such a state - Texas.  And I am volunteering for Enroll America and have volunteered to work with the navigators at the non-profit in Houston.  My support of ACA doesn't mean that I do not lament the suffering, quite the contrary, it means I feel the suffering and see the suffering, and want to do everything in my power to get everyone access to affordable healthcare, regardless of how I feel about ACA.  

                  This diary did harm to ACA without merit, it was copied nearly word by word from the original.    

                  I hope your own personal story works out better for you, and I am confident it will.  

                  Peace

                  We are all in this together.

                  by htowngenie on Tue Aug 20, 2013 at 05:42:18 PM PDT

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                  •  I appreciate your apology. (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    kareylou

                    It was in part the suggestion that I wasn't able to make the calculations which I found condescending. But also, within the bounds of the dialogue we were having, I found it patronizing that you would insist that I was wrong about the judgment I was placing on my own anticipated experience with the ACA.

                    I lost my job due to my serious illness just over 2.5 years ago, and with it my family's paid health insurance. We have been struggling for months as a result of a precipitous drop in household income, a similarly dramatic increase in medical expenses, and the need to pay $18,000/year for insurance for a family of three (until I qualified for Medicare). When all this started, we were yearning for January 2014 in the hope that at least some of this burden would be lifted. Unfortunately for us, it does not appear that it will be. This is not a miscalculation or a misreading on my part; I've been following carefully and I haven't seen anything to indicate I'm wrong.

                    Now, the hypothetical family that is used here to illustrate the ACA design flaws may well wind up $1500/year ahead of the game if the dependents get coverage on the exchange while the employee retains employer-sponsored health care. But I'm pretty confident that anyone in this situation would be frustrated that more relief is still so far away, when by rights it shouldn't be.

                    Yes, of course it will be helpful to all of us if the ACA also helps slow the insurance cost increases. I don't think I'm unusual, however, in looking at today's bills before I look at those a few years down the road. As you note, so many of us are already suffering; promising help at some later point doesn't often provide much comfort.

                    Will problems like these under discussion here be enough to advance the cause for Medicare for All? Maybe. Time will tell.

                    It is good to see that you are active with the effort to enroll people in programs available for the poor and uninsured in Texas. I salute your service. The final decision has not been made in my state, and there is some chance it will go in the right direction here. In any case, I hope that the backlash against the politicians who are willing to sacrifice people's lives for ideology will be fast and severe. But time will tell that too.

                    Peace

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                    by peregrine kate on Tue Aug 20, 2013 at 06:54:46 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  I am sorry to hear that (1+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      peregrine kate

                      and I feel your pain.  Really I do.  I've been laid off before and I was sole insurance in my family (my husband was a self-employed musician).  Although, unlike you, I didn't have any medical needs, which was divine luck.  I worried about it constantly.  This was many years ago now.  

                      However, my own parents, 86 and 84, spend $6,000 of their own money each month on his nursing home expenses.  At this rate, their savings will run out when they are 99 and 97.  They may die before that happens but my mother frets about it each and everyday and lives like a hermit.  For people born during the depression who spent their lives working and saving just to see it all go this way is tragic.  

                      Our healthcare system is broken and I think about it constantly.  ACA is the only thing we have to latch onto at the moment and I have to go for it to alleviate the suffering and injustice I see until something better comes along.  

                      We are all in this together.

                      by htowngenie on Tue Aug 20, 2013 at 07:09:13 PM PDT

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    •  I think it's a problem if the employee (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      nextstep, peregrine kate

      can't choose for him/herself to either elect the employer's plan or go with an ACA plan. And without a penalty.

      Have we discovered whether that much is allowable yet? Because depending on the employer, it may be better to choose the ACA exchange over your employer's group health plan.

      •  ACA says that if the Employer's Insurance (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        barbwires, tardis10, SoCaliana

        for the individual employee is less than 9.5% of household income, the employee does not have this choice, and the employee and family members are not eligible for for government subsidies.

        The most important way to protect the environment is not to have more than one child.

        by nextstep on Tue Aug 20, 2013 at 03:52:41 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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