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View Diary: Tennessee church takes extreme stance against love (267 comments)

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  •  Doubt what you wish, I quoted precisely (0+ / 0-)

    the New International Version translation of the Bible, I Corinthians 6:9-10 which you can read for yourself  here. You may be unfamiliar with it, but it's the translation I prefer to quote from, as opposed to the King James Version, because it uses contemporary English and is easy for those unaccustomed to reading the Bible to understand.

    Regarding context, I stated that the context was the entire chapter the verses were taken from and the chapter immediately preceding. That would be all of Chapters 5 and 6. That is the context. You may read them for yourself. If you don't like the New international Version, pick another. The site I directed you to has twenty different translation plus parallel and interlinear translations. Pick the one you like.

    I believe your dispute here is really with St. Paul and his teachings. You don't like them. You don't have to like them. But they are what they are, and thousands of theologians and scholars over nearly two millennia agree as to what they are. I'm not breaking any new ground here, you are. Burden of proof is on you.

    "Some folks rob you with a six-gun, some rob you with a fountain pen." - Woody Guthrie

    by Involuntary Exile on Fri Aug 23, 2013 at 09:09:19 PM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  Nope! (0+ / 0-)

      As I stated, you are clearly wrong. You have not stated anything that I and many others (who also agree with me) have not heard before. The so called "scholars" that you speak of do not have any idea about what homosexuality actually is (a sexual orientation) or our modern understanding of such.

      As I stated above, the Koine Greek words in I Corinthians 6:9-10 do NOT mean homosexuality or the sex that gay couples have as an expression of that love. They * might* have to do with temple prostitution which is condemned many times in the Torah (and, also in the NT). However, no one today really knows because Saul of Tarsus apparently created a new Koine Greek term (arsenokoites) which had not been used before. There is not enough context for us to know what he meant. And, most modern scholars agree with me. The other word (malakos) simply meant soft. It was interpreted in the KJV to mean effeminate. The Roman idea of what was effeminate is not what ours is. It's a bad translation anyway, because that would mean that most women would not inherit the kingdom of G-d. That's ridiculous.

      I don't care what the NIV says. It's a lousy translation of that passage. And, you have NO idea what you are even talking about with regard to context. See my post below about the temple of Aphrodite.

      I have plenty of issues with Saul of Tarsus (such as his misogyny), but this is NOT one of them.

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