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View Diary: Daily Kos Elections Live Digest: 8/29 (398 comments)

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  •  Well consider the source (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    TDDVandy, James Allen

    I grew up in a small town with a graduating class of 48 students.  Routinely schools further into the Adirondacks have graduating classes in the single-digits.

    I get the argument for large schools and small schools, I'm at one end of the extreme and you're at the other.  I think we'd both agree that being more towards the middle is better, where feasible.

    I know one of my former bosses went to Neshaminy HS in suburban Philly before it built new schools and had a graduating class of like 1100 or something ridiculous.  That's just way too big.

    "What if you're on a game show one day and the name of some random New Jersey state senator is the only thing between you and several thousand dollars? And you'll think to yourself, "if only I had clapped faster." - sapelcovits

    by rdw72777 on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 08:28:57 AM PDT

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    •  Years ago, when many Long Island schools (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      TDDVandy, James Allen

      were experiencing a bump in growth, the state commissioner of education (or something like that) went to the Sachem School District. They showed him, this tiny little old man, basically getting lost in a sea of students on News12. This was the sort of district that would usually have around 1100-1200 people in a graduating class, at least, before they split up the high schools.

      "At this point, if the president came out in favor of breathing, [Republican leaders would] tell their caucus members to hold their breaths."--Jared Bernstein

      by bjssp on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 08:34:54 AM PDT

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    •  Good point. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      James Allen, geoneb

      My high school had a graduating class of around 400 students.  I thought that was a pretty good size, but around here they're insane.

      (And, in fairness, a lot of the reason for larger high schools in Texas IS football... but that's a whole different debate.)

      29, white male, TX-07 (current), TN-09 (born), TN-08 (where parents live now)

      by TDDVandy on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 08:37:52 AM PDT

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      •  I could see 400 being okay (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        TDDVandy

        Honestly my school was too small too offer much.  Each season had a single sport (soccer but not football, etc).  Clubs were pretty sparse and not much in terms of AP classes (you had to go to the community college for advanced work).

        But the positives were plentiful too.  There are larger districts nearby (15 miles away) that people can attend if they move that small distance and get all the largesse.  

        People certainly factor in schools with their living decisions...except if you grew on a 3rd generation farm that can't easily be moved :-)

        "What if you're on a game show one day and the name of some random New Jersey state senator is the only thing between you and several thousand dollars? And you'll think to yourself, "if only I had clapped faster." - sapelcovits

        by rdw72777 on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 08:44:23 AM PDT

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        •  Yeah. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          rdw72777

          The high school as a whole had around 2000 students.  You had pretty much any sport that the state sanctioned and a good number of AP classes.

          Which is kind of the point.  Any bigger than that, and it's not like you can offer anything more to the kids.

          29, white male, TX-07 (current), TN-09 (born), TN-08 (where parents live now)

          by TDDVandy on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 08:47:04 AM PDT

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          •  Your last sentence (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            WisJohn, TDDVandy

            Really is the key.  Anything larger than that and the emphsais seems to be lowering overhead as a smaller school would have increased facilities and administration.

            I've never quite understood how parents could get comfortable sending their kids to a school so big.  Maybe it's my own experience, but how do you not feel lost in the masses each and every day.

            "What if you're on a game show one day and the name of some random New Jersey state senator is the only thing between you and several thousand dollars? And you'll think to yourself, "if only I had clapped faster." - sapelcovits

            by rdw72777 on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 08:50:41 AM PDT

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            •  I don't get it, either (0+ / 0-)

              But if you live in the Dallas or Houston metro areas (or, honestly, San Antonio and Austin), your options are rather... limited.

              Basically, the public high schools in Houston that aren't huge are either (a) depopulated inner-city schools or (b) far, far out into the exurbs.  The smallest you're going to get other than those two are around 2,000 students.  Which isn't TOO bad.

              I mostly agree with you, but a lot of parents apparently like the idea of sending their kids to those schools.  Some of it, certainly, is that the oversized high schools tend to be good schools academically (at least, by reputation) so I guess that's a fair trade-off.

              29, white male, TX-07 (current), TN-09 (born), TN-08 (where parents live now)

              by TDDVandy on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 09:58:39 AM PDT

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              •  I went to a magnet school in Austin (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                DCCyclone

                And Austin suburbs have really good schools (Westlake, etc.)

                23 Burkean Post Modern Gay Democrat; NM-2 (Raised), TX-20 (B.A. & M.A. in Political Science), TX-17 (Home); 08/12 PVIs

                by wwmiv on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 10:11:19 AM PDT

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                •  When you went to this school, (3+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  jncca, James Allen, geoneb

                  did you have to be careful about the amount of metal you carried with you?

                  How are the kids supposed to learn if they can't even fit in the building?

                  "At this point, if the president came out in favor of breathing, [Republican leaders would] tell their caucus members to hold their breaths."--Jared Bernstein

                  by bjssp on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 10:12:41 AM PDT

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                  •  Yes (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    DCCyclone

                    The magnet school was housed in a school on the east side (read: ghetto) where security was taken... very seriously. My senior year alone saw a race riot that resulted in around 50 people being expelled and two bomb threats (one legit and one not) that required a complete school shutdown (we were locked in the rooms, no evacuation).

                    Almost all of my friends were not in the magnet program. They were neighborhood kids. I hate to say this, but most of the magnet kids were huge nerds and I was the rare intelligent prep who happened to get alone better with ghetto black girls that I did with stuck up band geeks.

                    23 Burkean Post Modern Gay Democrat; NM-2 (Raised), TX-20 (B.A. & M.A. in Political Science), TX-17 (Home); 08/12 PVIs

                    by wwmiv on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 10:19:33 AM PDT

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                    •  That (0+ / 0-)

                      was a much more serious reply. I thought the Zoolander reference at the end would have tipped you off about the joe about magnets and metal, as in actual magents and not a name for a school.

                      Oh well. My high school had at least one bomb threat that I remember, but it was around 1999-2000, and it was only made because the kid wanted more time for winter break. Seriously. Apparently, he didn't realize sending the bomb threat from his own house (I think) would make it easy for the authorities to track him down. There was also some sort of cafeteria food fight that was actually classified as a riot due to some county law or some such bullshit, but I missed that as I was in the library at the time.

                      "At this point, if the president came out in favor of breathing, [Republican leaders would] tell their caucus members to hold their breaths."--Jared Bernstein

                      by bjssp on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 10:24:18 AM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

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