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View Diary: Open thread for night owls: Floating Japanese L-Zero magnetic levitation test train hits 310 mph (127 comments)

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  •  It was a boondoggle in Germany. (0+ / 0-)

    They spent tons of money and then cancelled it.

    And tbh., what's the point if one all ready has 310 mph bullet trains and electric/hybrid planes on the horizon for short and medium range routes?  The Maglev is more expensive to construct and isn't exactly some kind of big jump.

    "A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle" - Mohammed Nabbous, R.I.P.

    by Lawrence on Fri Sep 06, 2013 at 08:18:29 AM PDT

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    •  Citation? (0+ / 0-)

      I'd like to look into what you're saying.

      "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

      by DocGonzo on Fri Sep 06, 2013 at 08:24:08 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Here you go: (0+ / 0-)

        "A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle" - Mohammed Nabbous, R.I.P.

        by Lawrence on Fri Sep 06, 2013 at 09:09:18 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  But In Shanghai (0+ / 0-)

          I'd like to see whether the same project in Shanghai is a boondoggle, since it's already in operation.

          Also, that article you cited was from 2008, when Munich shelved the project as too expensive. But the limit was because it exceeded the public subsidy available, which was "only" about a $billion. The projects we're talking about are dozens of $billions.

          I'm not so sure these Maglev projects, years later in a different global economy, at very different scales, in very different countries, are at all comparable to the Munich one that aborted. Which wouldn't mean these aren't boondoggles, just that the Munich yardstick doesn't seem to measure these others very accurately.

          "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

          by DocGonzo on Fri Sep 06, 2013 at 11:51:24 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Not as fast as a speeding bullet (train) (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Lawrence

      Nobody has a 310mph (500km/h) bullet train either operating or even in the planning stages. Right now the regular top speed of most TGV and shinkansen trains is 320km/h (200 mph), some Chinese fast trains are aiming at 350km/h. Improvements beyond that point using existing or upgraded track will be difficult and costly.

       The French built a racecar version of their TGV to take the steel-wheel train speed record at 575km/h, damaging the track and the overhead power cables and providing the crew with a very uncomfortable ride. The Japanese maglev system is regularly running at 500km/h causing no damage to the track and providing a comfortable smooth ride to the passengers and there are plans to up that speed to 700km/h and more in the future as the technology develops.

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