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View Diary: Tech analyst: NSA 'will kill the U.S. technology industry singlehandedly' (181 comments)

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  •  I think (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    stevemb, Shockwave, mrkvica

    When she said "will kill", she meant more "hit them hard".  And she provided a good case for that reading of it.

    Republicans: Taking the country back ... to the 19th century

    by yet another liberal on Wed Sep 11, 2013 at 11:09:44 AM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  which is why i said it's a stupid statement (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Stude Dude, fladem, duhban

      1. it's hyperbole
      2. it's making predictions about the future based on very little evidence.

      -You want to change the system, run for office.

      by Deep Texan on Wed Sep 11, 2013 at 11:13:07 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  In any case (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        stevemb, cybrestrike

        I'm glad to see some pushback on these secret court rulings.  I think it has the potential to effect sales if not addressed.

        Republicans: Taking the country back ... to the 19th century

        by yet another liberal on Wed Sep 11, 2013 at 11:15:59 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  that predicted revenue was always going to be (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          yet another liberal

          lost to foreign providers at some point.

          they can do it cheaper. the issues are can they adequately staff and support it. do they have a reliable power grid and government protections etc.

          as soon as the foreign companies can host their data closer to home, they will do it. hosting automatically means somebody else has your data and the possibilities of fraud/abuse are rampant.

          as an admin i have access to patent documents and really just about anything connected to the system.

          i can stand up a private/public cloud anywhere. i just need the hardware.

          -You want to change the system, run for office.

          by Deep Texan on Wed Sep 11, 2013 at 11:42:23 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Er, Say What? (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            tommymet, mrkvica
            as soon as the foreign companies can host their data closer to home, they will do it
            Data can be hosted anywhere; there's no particular advantage in hosting it close to home unless you're dealing with the kind of high-speed application where millisecond speed-of-light lags actually matter.

            Before this NSA's dirt escaped from under the rug, the US-based companies had various small but significant advantages deriving from longer track records and greater economies of scale than most of the foreign competition. Those advantages aren't enough to offset the damage done by the snooping fiasco, however.

            Bottom Line: The NSA's actions are going to cost the US economy billions of dollars, and, no, it can't be handwaved away as something that would have happened anyway. All that can be done now is to try to reform the system fast enough to stanch the bleeding somewhat.

            On the Internet, nobody knows if you're a dog... but everybody knows if you're a jackass.

            by stevemb on Wed Sep 11, 2013 at 12:19:01 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  money (0+ / 0-)

              do you know how much it costs to move data around?

              -You want to change the system, run for office.

              by Deep Texan on Wed Sep 11, 2013 at 12:27:36 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Moving data is free (0+ / 0-)

                Weirdly, moving data long distances vs. short distances costs the same.

                Of course, in some sense moving data long distances consumes more resources (routers, links, etc.). But nobody sells bandwidth that way. If you run a site and pay for 1TB of data, that's 1TB that moves between your servers and your hosting company's infrastructure. If the data then moves only within a city or across the planet, you pay the same. So to a web site, the distance doesn't matter.

                Of course, it costs the ISP more to use external transit than internal transit, so they care about that. But once it's off of their infrastructure, they also don't care if it's local or long distance. And fairly often ISPs have peering arrangements between each other, so bandwidth is "free" - it just consumes router ports, not dollars. So to the ISP doesn't care about distance.

                Then you're talking about the "internet backbone". I guess they care. But it's not reflected in their pricing...

          •  Can the NSA penetrate the firewalls of (0+ / 0-)

            foreign servers?

            I'll venture to guess... why, of course!

            We should all be shocked if they can't.

            Why would backdoor access NOT be included in other database applications all over the globe?

      •  Predictions like (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Deep Texan

        this happen in technology all the time.  Product X will have X percent of the market share in 3 years.

        They are useful primarily as scrap paper.

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