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View Diary: Vladimir Putin Pens Remarkable OpEd in NY Times (257 comments)

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  •  You know, I agree with you - (0+ / 0-)

    We have to listen to Putin, by virtue of his immense leverage. And we have to work with him. And, yes, he has created a valuable opening in the last 48 hours, in comparison to where things stood previously.

    But there was no mention in the diary that Putin helped create the nightmare in the first place. No mention that he has strenuously backed Assad through 2.5 years of slaughter. Because of these omissions, one would think (if one didn't know better) that Putin has been a constructive player.

    The point of my comment was to point out the stunning hypocrisy of Putin's op-ed.

    Putin's actions in the last 48 hours are constructive only in comparison to what they were before. But of course his policy is still destructive. If he really wanted to contribute to peace, he would withdraw economic, military, and diplomatic support from Assad.

    •  Would we do the same from the rebels, if we (0+ / 0-)

      were interested in peace, instead of ramping up arms shipments? You know, the rebels are not all decent people.  A good number of them are pretty horrible and have committed numerous atrocities and war crimes themselves.

      I'm just pointing out the hypocrisy of our own government, which should be something we can influence, but apparently is not.

      "The law is meant to be my servant and not my master, still less my torturer and my murderer." -- James Baldwin. July 11, 1966.

      by YucatanMan on Wed Sep 11, 2013 at 11:41:07 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  To be clear, I'm not defending Putin. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Tardisgal

      However, our own government has been fanning the killing for sometime as well. We're in this up to our necks. That's not news.

      If we wanted killing to stop, there's much more that we could do. We could start by pressuring the Saudis to stop funding the radicals and fundamental Islamists they're shipping into Syria by the hundreds.

      We could help reduce suffering by deploying field hospitals to Turkey and Jordan to help the grievously wounded civilians from both sides who are fleeing their homes.

      There is much the USA could do to ease the civilian toll, yet we're focused on the CIA training rebels and delivering more guns and ammunition into the battles.

      War profiteering. Good for the profiteers across the ocean. Not so good for Syria.

      "The law is meant to be my servant and not my master, still less my torturer and my murderer." -- James Baldwin. July 11, 1966.

      by YucatanMan on Wed Sep 11, 2013 at 11:45:35 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  An argument has been made by (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        YucatanMan

        members of the democratic opposition in Syria that the US should have intervened forcefully in 2011, before the jihadist rebels gathered strength.

        •  If we were ever to intervene, that probably would (0+ / 0-)

          have been the time to do so.

          The question, I think, is how do we determine when to do 'early intervention' in those types of situations and when do we not.  There are many similar situations which occur around the world.

          And then, how big a risk should we take?

          Should we go into Burma to protect their protesters?

          What about Tibet where China is deliberately relocating people and destroying their culture through mass oppression?

          What about Egypt?  Do we defend the 33 million protesters or the democratically-elected but not democratically-ruling president?

          But I do agree if we were going to intervene, it should have been before the jihaddists had arrived. The thing is that some of our "other allies" are supplying the jihaddists - the men, the money and the arms.  We've actually been closing our eyes to a similar thing in Syria as went on in Afghanistan under Reagan - arming jihaddists to get rid of the oppressor, but then you are stuck with armed jihaddists.

          There are so few up-sides in Syria.

          Do we do a 10 year occupation in nation after nation?  I just don't think we can do such a thing.

          "The law is meant to be my servant and not my master, still less my torturer and my murderer." -- James Baldwin. July 11, 1966.

          by YucatanMan on Thu Sep 12, 2013 at 11:05:49 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

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