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View Diary: KosAbility: Feline Vaccine Associated Sarcoma (101 comments)

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  •  Important information (12+ / 0-)

    Being aware of FVAS for awhile we have, for a number of years, declined routine vaxes for our cats, who are 100% indoors. However, the current "youngster" (she's an adult now) is a "biter", so we do get her shots annually in case she nips a visitor or guest. Our city code requires annual registration and vaccination. Everything I read about the issue back when would suggest it really isn't necessary that often. More like a 3 -5 year cycle could provide necessary protection for both animals and their contacts. Funny thing is, the city is largely interested in that annual registration fee. I'd happily pay it for all three cats on an annual basis, but not if the vax is required on the same schedule, so they are collecting only a third of what they could from us.

    “Texas is a so-called red state, but you’ve got 10 million Democrats here in Texas. And …, there are a whole lot of people here in Texas who need us, and who need us to fight for them.” President Obama

    by Catte Nappe on Sun Sep 22, 2013 at 04:59:01 PM PDT

    •  Both Frito and Cleo (12+ / 0-)

      would bite in play. I feel I have to keep the rabies current since it is required and what if someone comes by and the cat bites in play?  But both also 100% indoors. I've read different ideas on vaccine frequency

      The last few years I've done what the Vet recommended and that was rabies and distemper but not feline leukemia as she's 100% indoors. I have a friend that used to see a holistic Vet who advised to get the kitten shots but not again and to do a titer test - something that tests for the immunity. But I don't know much about that.

      Thanks for your comment.

      •  Three year cycle (10+ / 0-)

        It seems there is now an accepted standard for a three year cycle on rabies.

        We currently stock and suggest the use of the recombinant rabies vaccine, because there is some evidence that it is associated with a decreased risk of sarcoma formation (Srivastav et al, 2012). For the killed rabies vaccines, a booster is required at one year, and thereafter, rabies vaccination should be performed every 3 years using a vaccine approved for 3-year administration. According to recommendations of the vaccine-associated sarcoma task force, rabies vaccines are administered subcutaneously as distally as possible in the right rear limb.
        http://www.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/...

        There are studies suggesting an even longer period of protection is likely. That's where the titer tests would come in - assessing the level of antibodies and determining individually if a particular animal is still protected or needs an updated vax.

        I'm also reminded from the last sentence in the above blockquote that they started changing the vax locations. It used to be a combined dose of xeveral vaxxes, all in one area around the neck/shoulder. Then they started giving different ones in different locations so they could better track which might cause a problem. the choice of a rear limb is so that if a sarcoma does occur they can amputate that one limb (if it happened in the neck area there are obviously no options).

        “Texas is a so-called red state, but you’ve got 10 million Democrats here in Texas. And …, there are a whole lot of people here in Texas who need us, and who need us to fight for them.” President Obama

        by Catte Nappe on Sun Sep 22, 2013 at 05:25:20 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  She shouldn't be getting most of her shots (3+ / 0-)

      annually.  It's not medically indicated and it's not particularly good for her.

      The AVMA currently recommends core vaccines every three years.  

      They do not consider rabies a core vaccine except in areas where the disease is endemic and the cat is at relatively high risk of exposure.

      Your city needs to change its laws.

      "But the traitors will pretend / that it's gettin' near the end / when it's beginning" P. Ochs

      by JesseCW on Mon Sep 23, 2013 at 02:30:19 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Here is a link to the reduced vaccination (3+ / 0-)

      protocol for dogs and cats:

      http://www.critteradvocacy.org/...

      In lieu of boosters for parvo/distemper (which are almost certainly unnecessary), you can get a blood titer done to make sure your pet is still immune.

      Dr. Shawn Messonnier up in Plano does them.

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