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View Diary: Cheers and Jeers: Thursday (131 comments)

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  •  MEGAJEERS and even a few TEARS (15+ / 0-)

    i just got notice of a 22 percent rent increase yesterday and I spent all night in a sleepless panic.

    my previous lease ended September 1 and I was waiting for a new lease to come, expecting an increase of some kind, but not 22 percent!!!

    I can't afford to come up with the rent increase money (and the money to add to the security deposit) in 12 days.

    since the previous lease expired, I cannot even point to the notice requirements in that least to say that 12 days is insufficient notice!

    if this were not such a ridiculously busy time at work I wold drop everything and start looking for a new apartment now but I can't afford to move either.

    I am taking deep breaths and appreciate any healing energy people can send my way.

    I'm ready to abandon the Democrats and join the RENT IS TOO DAMN HIGH party!  :-D

    Politics is like driving. To go backward put it in R. To go forward put it in D.
    Drop by The Grieving Room on Monday nights for support in dealing with grief.

    by TrueBlueMajority on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 06:50:02 AM PDT

    •  Yikes! 22% is ridiculous. (9+ / 0-)

      Any way you could get a roommate?

      Healing energy sent...

      "...I am superficially and ingenuously offended, which is to say, not offended, but suspicious that perhaps I should be." --Gentle Giant

      by Maudlin on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 06:58:44 AM PDT

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    •  If you are resident without a lease... (14+ / 0-)

      ...does that mean you are technically a tenant at will? Do you actually live in Boston, or nearby? If you're in Boston proper, I think there's a whole office set up to field inquiries and even mediate if things go wrong.

      Most states have caps on how large a percentage the rent can increase from lease to lease (I don't think Boston does, however, except for certain types of properties), as well as rules governing the timing of leases and notice of an increase (12 days is ridiculous; it's generally at least 30---I believe 30 days written notice of a rent increase is required in Boston). The law is generally on the renter's side and it is VERY hard to evict a resident (only a judge can evict you). Sorry you're having to go through this!

      the rent is too damn high photo: Jimmy McMillan for Governor Rent-is-too-damn-high.jpg

      "The truth can't hurt you, it's just like the dark. It scares you witless but in time you see things clear and stark." - Elvis Costello

      by Vacationland on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 07:08:50 AM PDT

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      •  thank you! (8+ / 0-)

        yes i am a tenant at will now, after six years with a lease.

        i went to the link you provided and the chat line there told me the landlord must give me a full rental period of notice so I am breathing a little easier now.  I may be able to find a place to move by November 1 if I hustle.  but rents are skyrocketing all over Boston all of a sudden.   I was in a relatively inexpensive part of Brighton but and now rents are going up everywhere.  I'll look at some of the close in surrounding towns that are accessible by public transportation.

        thanks for your practical and speedy help, Vacationland!

        Politics is like driving. To go backward put it in R. To go forward put it in D.
        Drop by The Grieving Room on Monday nights for support in dealing with grief.

        by TrueBlueMajority on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 07:30:42 AM PDT

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        •  I lived in Boston for many years (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          TrueBlueMajority

          And tangled with a lot of landlords in my day, from Brookline to the Fenway to Mission Hill to Dorchester to Allston and finally Brighton---it's easier these days to find information but there was always a tenant helpline. :-)

          As long as you're near the T, there's not a whole lot of difference between Newton or Watertown and Brighton, for example. The 'burbs can save you $$, and the commutes aren't all that different (the T is pretty speedy outside city limits). You're also less likely to have to pay brokers fees outside of the city. Good luck!

          "The truth can't hurt you, it's just like the dark. It scares you witless but in time you see things clear and stark." - Elvis Costello

          by Vacationland on Fri Sep 20, 2013 at 05:31:13 PM PDT

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    •  That is outrageous! Not only is it too high...you (8+ / 0-)

      got almost no notice.  

      It's been some time since I was a renter, but aren't there limits to how much rent can increase at one time?

      Others can offer you more practical advice, so I will do what I do best, and crank up the send healing energy machine....don't get too close, 'cause I've been known to bake brownies with this baby!

      Warm, loving energy coming your way...hope things work out well for you!

      candle orange lotus photo candleorangelotus_zps473b8342.jpg

      We cannot call ourselves a civilised society if we refuse to protect the weakest among us.

      by The Marti on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 07:13:52 AM PDT

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    •  Remember also... (10+ / 0-)

      ...when you are figuring out whether you can handle the 22% increase, convert that to a dollar figure and then add up the costs of moving: not just first month's/last month's/security deposit/possible broker's fees, but also costs for moving services and/or equipment, fees associated with transferring utility accounts and set-up (cable install, etc.). It may turn out that those costs would be more than the additional rent.

      Alternatively, if you like where you live and would want to stay there a while, see if your landlord might agree to a longer lease with a slightly lower per-month increase, or a slow step-up. For example, a 2-year lease with a 15% increase, or a 3-year with an increase that equals 22% by the 3rd year. It is not as much cash in hand for them in the short-term, but it might save them the costs associated with having to find new tenants and possibly having to fix up the place for a new tenant (painting, cleaning, etc.) or having the place vacant for a while.

      "The truth can't hurt you, it's just like the dark. It scares you witless but in time you see things clear and stark." - Elvis Costello

      by Vacationland on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 07:16:37 AM PDT

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    •  Jeez! We have a rental house (8+ / 0-)

      and we are so happy, when we have a good renter, that we do things like give them a break for stuff they've done to the property (that we approve/like) or just because, and have even lowered the rent once or twice. It just doesn't make sense to raise the rent like that, unless there's hordes of new renters out there. And we wouldn't do it unless we just wanted to get rid of the current renter.

      Good renters are good.

      When lots of people show up to vote, Democrats tend to win.

      by Audri on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 07:27:45 AM PDT

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