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View Diary: Voter registration arrangement with health exchanges may not be as robust as administration claimed (25 comments)

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  •  I went and looked it up (0+ / 0-)

    starting from the link in the story, quoted from The Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services by MSNBC.

    If you want to register to vote, you can complete a voter registration form at http://www.usa.gov.
    I started to type "voter" in the search box. When I got as far as "vo", it suggested "voter registration. Good. Accept that,  and you get links to several state sites, starting with California and North Carolina, plus the USA.gov Register to Vote page, which offers a link to the Election Assistance Commission. There is also a direct link to the EAC in the search results.

    The Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services should have directed viewers to the EAC in the first place, because this is where the story really starts.

    Resources for Voters

    Voting Tips for Elections (download tips card) [PDF] also see voter guides

    Before the next election, be familiar with the voting process in your State. The following tips from the U.S. Election Assistance Commission may help enhance your voting experience.

    Register to vote. Most States require citizens to be registered in order to vote. Make sure you understand the voter registration requirements of your State of residence. If you are not registered to vote, you must apply for voter registration no later than the deadline to register in your State. Contact your local or State elections office or check their Web site for information on how to obtain a voter registration application and the deadline to register. The National Voter Registration Application form is also available.

    Clicking the link for the National Voter Registration Application leads to this advice.
    The National Mail Voter Registration Form can be used to register U.S. citizens to vote, to update registration information due to a change of name, make a change of address or to register with a political party. You must follow the state-specific instructions listed for your state. They begin on page 3 of the form and are listed alphabetically by state. After filling out this form, you must sign your name where indicated and send it to your state or local election office for processing. Be sure you mail it in an envelope with the proper amount of postage.
    and to this link National Mail Voter Registration Form -- English.

    Nowhere is there any information about taking the application to the ACA exchange offices, or making the form available at the exchange offices, or anything else relating voter registration to the ACA. Searching on

    voter registration ACA exchange
    at USA.gov returns nothing of any use.

    Claiming that a link that eventually leads to this mail-in form has something to do with providing an opportunity to register at an exchange office is ludicrous.

    Clearly there is more to this story, and equally clearly nobody has told us what it is. For example, here are links stating that registration will be available in California and in Federally-run exchanges, but not telling us how it will be done. Will it be just like the process at the DMV, where you can get the form, fill it out, and submit it on the spot? Of course that is how it should work, but nobody at HHS has simply said, "Yes".

    California to Use Health Exchange for Voter Registration

    Secretary of State Debra Bowen made California the first state to designate its health exchange as a voter registration agency Wednesday, but others are expected to follow suit, said Shannan Velayas, Bowen's spokeswoman.
    Voter registration: Should the ACA exchanges be like the DMV?
    HHS also has indicated that it is required—under Section 7 of the motor voter law—to offer voter registration in the states where it will operate exchanges.
    There are two major concerns here. One is Republican obstructionism on both the ACA and on voting. Modern Southern Strategy Republicans never saw a voting restriction they didn't like, nor a program to assist voters that they did like, unless they could hire crooks to run their part of it. The other is apparently just plain bureaucratic inability to speak plain English and to answer the question asked.

    Ceterem censeo, gerrymandra delenda est

    by Mokurai on Fri Sep 27, 2013 at 07:48:19 AM PDT

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