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View Diary: Tom Clancy's Dark Legacy (205 comments)

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  •  The first book I read of Clancy's (21+ / 0-)

    was Red Storm Rising. Trying to follow any kind of story (and I'm still not convinced there was actually a story there) was so difficult because of the excruciating detail of every single bit of hardware that I threw the book away.

    I read some of this other books, and skimmed over the weapons details. There stories were so overly testosterone-filled that I laughed at them. Strong jawed, strong willed, perfect men are so boring, especially when they don't like strong women.

    I reject your reality and substitute my own - Adam Savage

    by woolibaar on Wed Oct 02, 2013 at 09:18:24 PM PDT

    •  I always considered Clancy's (7+ / 0-)

      heroes and villians to be "Disney-esque." Entirely 1-dimensional, excruciatingly shallow, with no redeeming qualities. And once I got to the read two pages skip ten habit because that was the distribution of plot to technical garbage, I quit reading altogether.

      There have been so many other really good writers of the genre whose books aren't painful to read. But Clancy had his following, and will be missed by them.

    •  Hunt for Red October was readable (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Shotput8, IreGyre, schumann, Matt Z

      I think I also read Sum of All Fears.  And maybe one or two others.  It  became very hard to tell, and you are spot-on: indecipherable, wonky techno-military garbage, worse than Trek babble and 10x worse because it was printed where you could go back and re-read it and it was still bullshit -- and no characters of any kind.  They were just names he probably pulled from a phone book.  None of them had any actual soul.

    •  Sounds a lot like Doc Savage! (6+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Shotput8, blue in NC, IreGyre, JVolvo, Matt Z, caul

      I haven't read and am not interested in reading Tom Clancy. However your description of "Strong jawed, strong willed, perfect men..." sounds like the Doc Savage paperbacks I read (and liked) when I was around 12 years old. Of course that was more than 50 years ago, and fortunately I've grown out of that phase. Now Nabokov, Borges, and Shakespeare along with British/Scottish mystery writers like Ian Rankin and Minette Walters are more to my tastes.

      But if the cause be not good, the king himself hath a heavy reckoning to make, ... there are few die well that die in a battle; ... Now, if these men do not die well, it will be a black matter for the king that led them to it; — Shakespeare, ‘Henry V’

      by dewtx on Thu Oct 03, 2013 at 07:20:20 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Ruth Rendell is fun, too... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        dewtx, caul

        .....in case you've missed her so far.

        Misconduct by the government is by definition NOT a government secret.

        by Doug in SF on Thu Oct 03, 2013 at 09:53:33 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I read her too. (0+ / 0-)

          I also like the Northern Irish mystery/thriller writer Stuart Neville known for "The Twelve" (aka "The Ghosts of Belfast" in the U.S.)

          But if the cause be not good, the king himself hath a heavy reckoning to make, ... there are few die well that die in a battle; ... Now, if these men do not die well, it will be a black matter for the king that led them to it; — Shakespeare, ‘Henry V’

          by dewtx on Thu Oct 03, 2013 at 11:09:56 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Try reading Colin Cotterill's Siri Paiboun series (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          RiveroftheWest

          if you want quirky mysteries that give a different perspective on war--specifically the U.S. actions in Vietnam and Laos.
          The mysteries are set in Laos in 1979, centering around the cases of Dr. Siri Paiboun, devoted former Laotian revolutionary, reincarnated Hmong shaman, and reluctant national coroner.
          Cotterill's books are macabre, funny, and embarassingly frank about the misery inflicted on Laos and the Hmong people as a result of U.S. arrogance.

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