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View Diary: Republicans still get their wish, austerity for the least amongst us (31 comments)

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  •  It is doable. If you have Section 8. Good luck (5+ / 0-)

    getting on Section 8 if you haven't yet. Most places it's closed and there is a waiting list. Many places even the waiting list is closed.

    I've been eligible for Section 8 for years. Can't even apply.

    I'd like to start a new meme: "No means no" is a misnomer. It should be "Only 'Yes' means yes." Just because someone doesn't say "No" doesn't mean they've given consent. If she didn't say "Yes", there is no consent.

    by second gen on Thu Oct 17, 2013 at 11:50:16 AM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  Section 8 has wait lists years long (5+ / 0-)

      And in most communities I've tried to get it the list was closed because it was over five years long. Section 8 is a pie in the sky that isn't really there. There are exceptions but those are few and far between.

      •  I really would like to see a special group (3+ / 0-)

        for everything considering homelessness. It must be talked about. And my feeling is, it's not. Charity is one thing, policies another, not knowing what it means to be in the shoes of a homeless person is not acceptable for anyone who is not homeless.

        We should know much more about how people become homeless, when does it start, why ... without blame gaming the issue.

        We all are not born homeless ...

    •  can you explain a little bit was section 8 (3+ / 0-)

      consists of? Just for the record. I intend to research that myself later, I just wished to have the hard facts altogether here.

      •  It's a HUD program for housing assistance. (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mimi, Horace Boothroyd III, CroneWit

        It helps pay a portion of rents (and in some cases house payments) for low income individuals. It helps pay rent based on a percentage of the market value of an apartment or home. You are required to pay a percentage of that value, the program pays the rest. Landlords can opt out, but if they opt in, they must accept the agreed upon market value for the rent.

        For instance, my mother is on Social Security. She is almost 80. She rents an apartment that typically goes for about $800/mo. With Section 8 housing allowance, she pays just over $300/mo. For anyone thinking that's a lot of money for an apartment to begin with, it most certainly is. It is also a HUD housing complex that is income based. Even if you're paying your rent on your own, your maximum income is something like $30-35k. Not sure what it is today, but I almost moved there, and their max in about 2002 was $29k, and the rent was $750.

        I'd like to start a new meme: "No means no" is a misnomer. It should be "Only 'Yes' means yes." Just because someone doesn't say "No" doesn't mean they've given consent. If she didn't say "Yes", there is no consent.

        by second gen on Thu Oct 17, 2013 at 12:35:19 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I really would like to know more about that (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Horace Boothroyd III, CroneWit

          how they calculate your income and how low an income you have to have to apply for the HUD program housing assistance. I remember that some townhouse complexes in pretty expensive neighborhoods in DC had sections reserved for low income renters and the waiting lists were four years and more. That was in the nineties.

          I should educate myself of all of it. Somehow drowned under my radar of conscience since 2001.

          For example how does a homeless person keep an address to get mail? Do they need friends, who allow them to use their own home address?

          •  Here's a start. (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            mimi, Horace Boothroyd III, CroneWit

            I'd like to start a new meme: "No means no" is a misnomer. It should be "Only 'Yes' means yes." Just because someone doesn't say "No" doesn't mean they've given consent. If she didn't say "Yes", there is no consent.

            by second gen on Thu Oct 17, 2013 at 12:52:41 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  'Project-based' vs 'voucher' HUD housing (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Horace Boothroyd III, mimi

            There are two ways to get a HUD subsidy for housing.  second gen has done a good job of describing the 'voucher' program -- in which you, as an individual receive a voucher 'attached' to you, that you can take to landlords.

            The other way is called 'Project-based' -- the 'project' meaning an apartment complex where the Owner has a contract with HUD (and possibly with some State funding as well), and must administer the project according to HUD regulations.  If you can bear to wade through a dense bureaucratic document, you can google 'HUD Handbook 4350.3', (find the current version, old & new ones are listed at HUD.gov), and read the chapter on Eligibility.  Sample leases (which must be used) are in the Appendix.

            Within project-based HUD housing, there are two categories of projects:  those for disabled and/or elderly (I don't remember the age cut-off, sorry), and those for all ages, including households with children (I'm in this kind of housing).

            Based on what I've heard & seen in the local paper, the impossibility of getting a voucher is common -- and the voucher program funding seems to be cut often.  Funding for project-based housing seems more stable, perhaps because of its being interwoven with banking and private owners (some corporate).

            You might do better by finding the project-based Section 8 housing in your locale and just going in for an intake interview.  You'll have to report extensively on your income/expenses (including medical) -- pretty invasive, but just be honest and help try to find any info they may need.  I'll forewarn you -- even getting an interview may take months.  But if they say 'we don't expect openings for xx months', but are willing to set up the intake, take the appointment so you are on their waiting list.  You never know when an apartment will open up.

            As for your other questions about services for homeless and impoverished people, that all depends on your locale.  In my town, there is a service location, developed in 2000, that provides services such as a 'mailbox' for homeless.  Use your google-fu and do some searching; or you could contact, say, your local Food Bank or Food Stamps office and ask for referrals or contact lists.  And that 211 phone number in HB's letter above?  It may not be nationwide, but many areas have adopted this service -- you can call and ask your questions, and they can give you contact info.  With luck, you'll find some kind of central location that can give you info on all the services available locally, and maybe even some case-management to help you negotiate the maze(s).

            Wishing you good luck!

            •  Thank you so much for this detailed comment ... (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Horace Boothroyd III, CroneWit

              I hope it will help others to do the research. Just saying that I was asking this not for myself, but for people who don't know how to take the first steps, to get some advice. You just did this very well. Thank you.

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