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View Diary: NYC Mayor: Bill de Blasio (D) Says CompStat Can Be Reprogrammed To Respect The Constitution (19 comments)

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  •  De Blasio should be interesting as a mayor (1+ / 0-)
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    Justanothernyer

    It's hard to know what to expect.  I certainly agree with his politics in most cases, but following a mayor who has done a pretty incredible job in New York City in 12 years will be challenging.  Crime is so low, tourism is so high, the city is so vibrant, housing is booming off the charts and the rise in wealth is extraordinary, it's rather amazing what Bloomberg has been able to do.

    I know people like to rip Bloomberg here, but the guy is quite the liberal despite his "Independent" nametag; gun control, climate change, anti-smoking, anti-obesity, the guy is basically the international leader on each of these fronts.

    In 12 years, I think the only thing I didn't like that Bloomberg did was his overrunning the city with bike lanes.  It stinks to think of the amount of money that was spent on a mode of transportation that is used by about 1 percent of the city's commuters (and of that 1 percent, the vast majority are white male).  I never know whether to laugh or cry when I walk by the silly "Citibike" stands that go untouched about 98 percent of the day.

    But other than that, De Blasio has big shoes to fill.  I wish him well.

    •  Bloomberg has never really (6+ / 0-)

      set about representing all New Yorkers, appearing again and again to be quite flirtatious with only those New Yorkers with fat wallets.  

      I don't believe Bloomberg's stint as mayor -- approximately 3 terms too long by my estimate -- was a significant success.  I don't perceive him to be "the international leader" on much of anything.  

      As for bike lanes, I like them.  I like bikes.  I like the people who ride them.  They deserve safe passage through large cities and small.  Long may they wheel through the streets -- and may they be safe while they so wheel.  

      •  Fair enough (0+ / 0-)

        Can agree to disagree on all of that.  The bike question though, before Bloomberg there were already bike paths in Central Park, so people were always able to ride safely.  I just don't get why Bloomberg had to take over the roads with them when Central Park already had all the bike paths anyone could ever need.

        •  Regarding bikes in NYC... (3+ / 0-)
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          slipper, Remediator, jbob

          Slipper wrote:

          The bike question though, before Bloomberg there were already bike paths in Central Park, so people were always able to ride safely.  I just don't get why Bloomberg had to take over the roads with them when Central Park already had all the bike paths anyone could ever need.
          As far as I can tell, you are only thinking about bikes from the point of view of recreation.  But for commuting and personal business use, even just in Manhattan, bike paths in Central Park are of limited use--Central Park ends at 59th street, below which you have most of the business district of Manhattan.  And then there is the matter of the other boroughs--many people commute by bike in Brooklyn, and between Brooklyn and Manhattan, etc.
          I never know whether to laugh or cry when I walk by the silly "Citibike" stands that go untouched about 98 percent of the day.
          This has not been my observation.  In the Washington Square Park area, and in midtown as well, Citibike use appears to be quite heavy--one frequently sees the stands having only a few bikes left as the others are all out being used.  

          It is a fact that most U.S. cities are entirely too car-centric, at the expense of pedestrians, bike riders and public transport.  While New York is better than most U.S. cities for public transport, car traffic has long been a horrendous problem, what with the pollution, noise, threats to the safety of pedestrians and bike riders, etc.  The addition of bike lanes and better pedestrian accomodation has been long overdue.  Now, maybe we can start catching up with cities like Amsterdam or Montreal, where riding a bike or walking is not such a hazard.

          •  Fair points (0+ / 0-)

            I can only comment on the Citibike stands I've seen, and those have had like no use.  They just seem to take up room.

            Also a fair point that I was pretty much strictly limiting my thought of bike use to recreation.  But that's because only 1 percent of commuters in NYC use bikes to commute, so I thought it was a fair comment to focus on recreation.  I've never really heard of people biking to work (I would think that would get kind of sweaty).  But I hear your viewpoint.

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