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View Diary: Estate Recovery - It's Worse Than You Thought. (46 comments)

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  •  there is nothing new in the "estate recovery" (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    WakeUpNeo, annominous

    of benefits for extensive medical care if possible.

    would you RATHER seniors be forced to sell their homes and become poverty stricken instead of having gotten aid?

    this is a non-starter pants-on-fire diary and it is yet another attempt to discredit the ACA.

    enough already - learn about the historical precedent that has been going on for over 40 years before you hyperventilate, please.

    EdriesShop Is it kind? is it true? is it necessary?

    by edrie on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 07:11:44 PM PDT

    •  edrie, really? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Phoebe Loosinhouse, TiaRachel

      I've always liked what I've seen of what you write and what you do.  It's a bit distressing that you are seeking to discredit me like this.

      If you think I am somehow some kind of secret right wing activist, please go look up my profile and my history and visit my personal websites.

      One reason I keep writing about this is that I have worked hard for health care reform, and continue to work to try to get my state to expand Medicaid. I am 57 years old and have not had health insurance since 1990. It is ironic, and distressing to me, that after all this, the Medicaid I have worked for all low income people in my state to be able to access may in effect be unaffordably expensive for me and others like me.

      If you act out of anger, the best part of your brain fails to function. - the Dalai Lama

      by beverlywoods on Tue Oct 22, 2013 at 04:53:43 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  beverly, i'm not trying to discredit you - and i (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        beverlywoods

        also apologize for my tone - no excuses, really (but i'm still recovering from surgery and not posting much because i'm really cranky - you got caught in that).

        this was occurring back in the 80s and 90s for those who ran out of funds and had to go on public assistance, mostly for nursing homes, etc.

        i am currently on medicaid (thanks to my sister absconding with mom's estate - another reason i'm cranky, but that is now making its way through the courts, so it will change).

        when i became eligible for medicaid a little over a year ago, it was clearly explained that should my circumstances change, medical might go after a return of the monies spent.

        i don't mind that - i look at this as a temporary stopgap and when i am able to return the money to the pool needed to cover people in need, that's okay by me.

        the sad reality for most seniors is that IF they reach the point of needing medicaid/medical or a program like it to supplement their medicare, chances are very good they will never get out of it.

        for the lucky few who do, then i don't see it as a problem that the money is recouped from their estates - mine, included.

        i look forward to the day i can walk in and say "i don't NEED this assistance any longer!"

        i, too, had no health insurance for the bulk of my life and was dependent on living until medicare to be able to afford coverage.  i understand where you are coming from.

        the subsidies should help if you are on the edge of affordability - but that isn't what i got from your diaries - and please correct me if i am wrong.  what i read was that you were upset that medicaid would attempt to recover from the estates of those using medicaid AFTER they died.  

        as i said, i don't have a problem with that.  it puts more into the pool for those who need help who are still living.

        again, i apologize for my tone - i'm staying offline for a reason right now.  it is my own crabbiness and anger over having to fly to n.c. to deal with my own mom's estate preparing for the court battle to come.

        if i've missed what you were trying to say, then let's definitely continue this down the road.  i'll try to rein in my own issues in the future.

        EdriesShop Is it kind? is it true? is it necessary?

        by edrie on Tue Oct 22, 2013 at 12:03:54 PM PDT

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        •  I wish you good results (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          edrie

          in your efforts in court. What you are going through sounds very difficult. Thanks for taking the time to post what you just did.

          To clarify, what I am specifically talking about in these diaries is not primarily seniors already of Medicare age who get to the point where they also need Medicaid.

          I am talking about people who are 55-64, who may come in just a few dollars shy of the amount they'd need as income to qualify for subsidized plans, and will therefore not be allowed to have that as an option. People who may be low income right now for one reason or another, but who have or may still acquire some assets. These are among the people who will be suddenly entering the Medicaid rolls in 2014 in states that accept Medicaid expansion.

          These may well be people who are not done earning or owning things or needing to move or sell or refinance their houses. If Medicaid puts liens on their houses, this will be a big problem for lots of people. And the fact that the state considers 100% of the "assistance" to be a loan, while others a few years younger or a few dollars richer get subsidized coverage, seems quite unfair as well.

          And don't forget that we are talking about amounts that, if Dr. Jane Orient is correct, may come out to up to $40,000 per year of enrollment, even if you never went to the doctor.

          This is the kind of thing I am concerned about. Having the state decide that someone whose income is below the poverty line owes the state $40,000 just because they were enrolled in a Medicaid program for a year does not feel like someone paying their fair share to me.

          wishing you all the best, edrie, and I hope I've succeeded in making my concerns somewhat clearer - and thanks to all, for your patience in wading through a lot of material on this subject.

          If you act out of anger, the best part of your brain fails to function. - the Dalai Lama

          by beverlywoods on Tue Oct 22, 2013 at 05:44:01 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  also please see the quote from the NY application (0+ / 0-)

            in the comment from TiaRachel below:

            I understand that once I get Medicaid coverage, if I am over 55 or if I am in a medical institution and not expected to return home, the Medicaid program may do the following in order to pay for my medical care:
                    Take money I already have or that is owned to me.
                    Take money that was made from selling certain things I own...
            This doesn't sound like they necessarily intend to wait until the recipient dies.

            If you act out of anger, the best part of your brain fails to function. - the Dalai Lama

            by beverlywoods on Tue Oct 22, 2013 at 05:52:25 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  i will read more when i am not so distracted. (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              beverlywoods

              what i do know now is that if i own a car and sell or give it away, i have to notify the state - it affects my eligibility - anything of value that i "give" away is looked at as an attempt to "defraud" medicaid.

              this may be the issue at hand.  i will look into it more when i get back from n.c. early november.

              thanks for wishing me luck - i'm going to need all the support i can find.  til then,  will be checking in when i can.

              best to you and may this be something that never materializes OR is fixed by subsequent legislation... another reason to throw the tea party out and time to start fixing the bad parts of the law!

              EdriesShop Is it kind? is it true? is it necessary?

              by edrie on Tue Oct 22, 2013 at 11:04:24 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

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