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View Diary: Your health plan changing? Employers, insurers largely to blame (100 comments)

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  •  It was your insurer's decision. It was not forced (5+ / 0-)

    by the ACA. In other words, the free market has responded to the ACA : private insurers are getting out of the individual market.

    •  Not forced, (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Mr Robert, britzklieg

      just a free market response. Because, of course, nobody foresaw that there would be either a free market or a response.

      •  So you admit it's a free-market response, meaning (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        htowngenie, icemilkcoffee

        YOU CAN GET BETTER INSURANCE ON THE EXCHANGES.

        But you'd rather bash the ACA than look. Wheee.

        "What could BPossibly go wrong??" -RLMiller "God is just pretend." - eru

        by nosleep4u on Fri Oct 25, 2013 at 05:53:07 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Obama does not interfere in the free market (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        britzklieg

        Otherwise he would be 'socialist', remember?

        •  Missing the point (0+ / 0-)

          It was predictable, and predicted, that the ACA, without being equipped to put any significant downwards pressure on premiums, drug prices, or medical cartels, would result in what we are seeing right now, i.e., notable rises in premiums of the kind I detailed elsewhere in the discussion. And BTW, "No," I cannot get better insurance than I now have in NYS by using the exchanges.

          •  Possibly too early to tell (0+ / 0-)

            The theory was that competition would reduce pricing. Before companies were competing to cherry-pick the healthiest patients. No they are prohibited from cherry-picking or rescinding, or providing sham insurance, so the theory is that they would compete on pricing.

            Also- this is the very first round of pricing. Possibly even the insurers do not know for sure what their exposure is. Wait for a year or two, and see how much premium rebate you get back (80-85% of premium must go to care, or else it's reimbursed back to customer), then you could have a valid comparison.

            There is no haggling with the medical cartels up front. That is true. But the ACA has extracted surtaxes on the insurers, the pharmaceuticals and the device makers. So one could say this is a 'rebate' at the back end.

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