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  •  "Well, now the Brecht problem is a little bit (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    RiveroftheWest

    solved for now." Oh, if it were only that easy!

    I found a lot to like in Magic Mountain - the near-death Greek reverie was my favorite bit. Mann, like Hesse, is good with psychic dichotomies.

    Rilke, I only know Letters to a Young Poet, and a handful of very fine poems I've come across. Kafka: just Metamorphosis and several stories (The Trial is high on my TBR shelf).

    The Sleepwalkers sounds hard but revelatory. Zweig intrigues. I'll get there.

    Henry Green is revelatory, too - just incredible that, with his strange approach, he tells stories and draws characters so well. I have a volume with Loving/Living/Party Going. I read the first two, then stopped. He felt a bit strange and rich, to digest all three in a row. I expect, when I get back to him, I'll read all three, and diary them.

    Having read no Ivy Compton-Burnett, I'm not sure what too much of her would be. But Henry Green is very interested in capturing the authentic speech and personalities (albeit seen from outside) of his characters, and Party Going is fertile ground for that.

    "Every man has a right to utter what he thinks truth" Samuel Johnson

    by Brecht on Tue Nov 26, 2013 at 07:08:16 AM PST

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    •  Ivy Compton-Burnett (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Brecht, RiveroftheWest

      think, drawing-room dialogue for 300 pages.  I enjoy Henry Green though but as you said have to take in doses, same with Bernhard, James Purdy for that matter.

      Rilke: 'Stiller Freund der vielen Fernen ...' I adore him; I've read LTAYP as well, also have read Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge and have the Duino Elegies&Orpheus compilation.

      Broch is masterful with the Sleepwalkers trilogy but each volume is only approx. 150ppgs so quite doable and I just love the pre-Great War era through Weimar, and so another Austrian from that epoch I enjoy and respect immensely is Arthur Schnitzler.

      Brecht I've read quite a bit of the poetry, the Collected Stories, Mother Courage, Caucasian Chalk Circle and have wonderful recordings by Gisela May, Ute Lemper, Lotte Lenya, Dave van Ronk & Frankie Armstrong.

      The Democrats care about you after you're born. --Ed Schultz

      by micsimov on Tue Nov 26, 2013 at 02:58:17 PM PST

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      •  If culture is refined, erudite, artistic, (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        RiveroftheWest

        you may well be better-read than me. It appears so, from this thread. Which is fine by me: I'm confident of my knowledge, perceptiveness, and voracity; and it means you have plenty to teach me.

        But I hope that you also explore the lower slopes of literature, and occasionally read Stephen King, J. K. Rowling and Elmore Leonard - just to see what's there.

        "Every man has a right to utter what he thinks truth" Samuel Johnson

        by Brecht on Tue Nov 26, 2013 at 03:40:02 PM PST

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        •  I've read some King, (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          RiveroftheWest, Brecht

          it was a story collection I believe or a series of interwoven tales, wish I could remember the title, I rather enjoyed it.  I've enjoyed, too, Harlan Ellison and Ursula K. Le Guin.  When I lived in Holland, I used to borrow and trade books with my Dutch boyfriend's mother, she was an avid reader, especially of Native American and Fantasy literature and her English was rather well so she had many titles on her shelves in English she always tried to read that way when she could, certain things of course, it just depended, was easier for her to read in Dutch translation; it was through her I was introduced to Terry Pratchett.

          The Democrats care about you after you're born. --Ed Schultz

          by micsimov on Wed Nov 27, 2013 at 09:49:01 AM PST

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          •  Glad to hear it. Not that I have any business (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            RiveroftheWest

            telling you what to read - but that's not about to stop me.

            All four of those write middlebrow, and also write well (at least, with awareness and notable strengths). LeGuin always writes well and, like Ellison, is generally very interesting. I tried a decent short story collection of King's (Everything's Eventual), but then found far more power in The Shining. One day I'll write an essay on Harold Bloom vs. Stephen King.

            I aim to read everything, but Fantasy is my chiefest comfort-reading.

            "Every man has a right to utter what he thinks truth" Samuel Johnson

            by Brecht on Wed Nov 27, 2013 at 12:47:34 PM PST

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            •  No don't stop, I do like your suggestions, (2+ / 0-)
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              Brecht, RiveroftheWest

              and I'm always looking for things to read that I might not come across on my own.  And I certainly have, like others, various moods in what I want to read, whether I want to plunge and delve, or pass the time in a faraway place or just be entertained/amused.  And I'm not about to lug around on the bus or train Broch, Mann or Woolf ;)

              The Democrats care about you after you're born. --Ed Schultz

              by micsimov on Thu Nov 28, 2013 at 08:13:45 AM PST

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