Skip to main content

View Diary: Maybe I'm Just Done. (105 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  It's a school policy (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Oh Mary Oh, ladybug53, kurt

    that those students that are somewhat capable should at least attempt the class and the test at the end of the year.

    the theory is (at least what I tell them) that even if they don't pass the test, they will have skills to help them think, write, and read better in other HS classes and in college.

    "There are worse crimes than burning books. One of them is not reading them." - Joseph Brodsky

    by Shakespeares Sister on Wed Dec 04, 2013 at 06:24:21 AM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  It doesn't (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Shakespeares Sister, ladybug53

      sound like they have been screened to be the "somewhat capable" students.

      And it's a dumb policy anyway. What a waste.

      Is there some reason you can't just teach a regular English class? It sounds like your school needs one. What has your admin said about this "everyone who can sit at a desk shall take an AP class" policy?

      Is this a public school?

      •  I have (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Buckeye Nut Schell, ladybug53, kurt

        two AP Lang classes, and to be fair, the second of the two are capable - though they still have to work extremely hard, and most of them lack confidence in their abilities.

        I also teach a "regular" world literature class (which I wrote about in my previous post about learned helplessness, and there is one other 11th grade world lit class taught by another teacher.

        It is an "innovation" school - so "somewhat" public. also, it used to be what you said, that "everyone who can sit at a desk shall take an AP class." they realized the futility - and frankly idiocy - of the policy and changed it. so, what happens is, really, all of the ELL students and students with IEPs end up in the "regular" classes, and all of the students without end up in AP. that is not 100% the case, but overall the truth of the situation.

        it's sad, really. my IB students (at my old school) had to pass a screening process to get into the IB program/IB classes, and they had to sign a contract once in that said if they weren't maintaining at least a C, they were removed from the class at semester. no such contracting here. maybe I should institute it.

        thanks for commenting.

        "There are worse crimes than burning books. One of them is not reading them." - Joseph Brodsky

        by Shakespeares Sister on Wed Dec 04, 2013 at 08:38:52 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  The contract idea (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Shakespeares Sister, ladybug53

          might be a fine one for students who are prepared to do AP work. But that doesn't sound like the students you are working with. It would be like putting the ELL kids in the AP class and insisting it is good for them to fail. These kids are just being set up to fail.

          But you know that.

          What does somewhat public mean? Is it a charter school?

          •  yes. (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            ladybug53, kurt

            I do know that.

            I do also have a lot of ELL students in my AP classes, though they are at the point of testing out of ELL services. so, the challenge is academic/AP-level vocabulary. the 12th grade AP Lit teacher and I are working intensively on helping develop their strategies for accessing academic vocabulary.

            and the school is Innovation/Charter.

            "There are worse crimes than burning books. One of them is not reading them." - Joseph Brodsky

            by Shakespeares Sister on Wed Dec 04, 2013 at 11:29:39 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  So has the charter (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Shakespeares Sister, ladybug53

              school sold itself to parents as offering these AP classes or otherwise preparing students for college? What is the reason they have adopted this insane plan?

              And aside from shoveling sand against the tide, what can you and your teacher friends do about it?

              •  well, (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Buckeye Nut Schell, ladybug53

                the overall goal is to have all students prepared for college without "remediation." I'm paraphrasing, but you get the idea.

                also, AP itself has come out with an equity statement about how students should have equitable access to the AP program, that it shouldn't be just for the "elite" kids anymore.

                obviously, the reality is different than the ideal.

                "There are worse crimes than burning books. One of them is not reading them." - Joseph Brodsky

                by Shakespeares Sister on Wed Dec 04, 2013 at 01:20:14 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  Yes, reality is different from marketing. (2+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Shakespeares Sister, ladybug53

                  But you are in the classroom every day doing your best, I'm sure. Unfortunately, it sounds like you are doing harm. As part of your job. Which was surely never your intention when you became a teacher.

                  So what are you going to do? Keep teaching inappropriate lessons to students who are not prepared for them and will, for the most part, fail. Or rabble-rouse to get some sort of improvement at your school? Or move on to a different job?

                  I know a few teachers who have hung in there -- first through the NCLB and now CC -- because they are just a year or two away from retirement.

                  But you have better options.

                  •  yes and no - (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    ladybug53

                    I spent 12 years in retail before teaching (and during the first couple of years so I could pay some bills).

                    right now, teaching is my expertise...and writing, to an extent. but I can't imagine breaking into the writing field is any easier than it is to get a teaching job these days, unfortunately.

                    "There are worse crimes than burning books. One of them is not reading them." - Joseph Brodsky

                    by Shakespeares Sister on Wed Dec 04, 2013 at 01:47:07 PM PST

                    [ Parent ]

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site