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View Diary: Beyond Grades and Honor Rolls (18 comments)

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  •  Unschooling schools (2+ / 0-)
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    FloridaSNMOM, angelajean

    Are you familiar with the Sudbury Valley School and others like it?  Many unschooling families obviously prefer no school at all, but other families are happy with this model that is an onsite community with an unschooling approach, coupled with a democratic process for running the school (all students and staff have one vote each) and a grievance process for school rules.

    I would love to see this model in the public arena, but with the assumptions and rules of the public model it is not possible. I would have sent my kids to one.  I would like my tax dollars to pay for one.  I would like to see funding to research it.

    I think it would cost a lot less than the public system and be more successful but with the assumptions I discuss in the diary it is unlikely to move forward any time soon.  I want that discussed.

    I agree with most of your last paragraph. Did you see the story Children Thrive in Rural Columbia's Flexible Schools?  Poor children, often of migrant workers, can work at their own pace so that when they are absent for months they don't fall behind or drop out altogether and they are not as likely to develop bad feelings about how they are doing.  I love reading this kind of out-of-the box thinking.  This program is not the standard, it addresses a need and is allowed to do so.

    •  The sad thing is that 'flexible school' isn't new. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      FloridaSNMOM
      Poor children, often of migrant workers, can work at their own pace so that when they are absent for months they don't fall behind or drop out altogether and they are not as likely to develop bad feelings about how they are doing.  I love reading this kind of out-of-the box thinking.  This program is not the standard, it addresses a need and is allowed to do so.
      You just described the one-room schools in which my great-grandfather taught. He was a "rover", covering multiple communities in south central Kentucky on horseback throughout the year. (An aside: Back then, Kentucky teaching certificates included the holder's subject-matter test scores; if multiple itinerant teachers showed up, they had something of a "score-off" to decide who would teach, or if duties might be split..) As one might expect in a poor, rural community, he had few regular students; kids would come in when they could--when their farm work allowed--and "pick up where they left off." This went on for years in some cases.

      Been there, done that, could do that again...

      I think that the "Academy" program at our public high school (mentioned in an earlier comment) is an interesting step toward giving students/parents more opportunities to self-direct, albeit within the context of the existing class offerings/structure. It's already showing progress in the "match abilities, not ages" area, in that qualified freshmen students are now taking courses formerly reserved to juniors and seniors.

      (I don't think I mentioned this earlier - I'm the brother, son, nephew, first cousin, second cousin, grandson and great-grandson of career educators whose areas of work have basically paralleled the development of the US educational system, from 1800s one-room schools to current elementary, high school and university classrooms. While I chose a different career path, I spend a great deal of my time designing and delivering what goes by the buzzwordy label of "technical enablement." Teaching is, as they say, in our blood.)

      The word "parent" is supposed to be a VERB, people...

      by wesmorgan1 on Sun Dec 08, 2013 at 06:37:06 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

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